Arbitration

Discussion in 'American Airlines' started by bigjets, Sep 19, 2018.

  1. Buck

    Buck Veteran
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    Thanks
     
  2. bigjets

    bigjets Veteran

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    #197 bigjets, Jan 9, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
    How many people think the association is holding out for arbitration?

    Based on the fact that the association needed to have an arbitrator decide crew chief seniority, and I feel as though the association doesn’t want to take any heat for a higher scope farmout % or higher health ins. costs and is more willing to say it wasn’t the association!!!!! Damn arbitrator screwed you guys!!!! The association needs more dues, these Will be the talking points in 2020, if we are lucky.
     
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  3. we're screwed

    we're screwed Member

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    Absolutely. Aww, we tried. we'll get em' next time.
     
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  4. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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    Just another way to not take the blame for the bad results that might be coming.
    They did it with the seniority game now they will do it with scope and maybe jobs.
    You guys need to get PRO-active and get rid of this asso. before they destroy the mechanics QOL.
     
  5. WeAAsles

    WeAAsles Veteran

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    Again you’re back in the new year attacking our Unions here at America Airlines but God forbid anyone attack your ineffective Union that’s been fruitlessly plugging away for almost 7 years now.

    It seemed like you might have finally decided to stop throwing chit at other people’s houses when you live in the most chitty one in the Neighborhood?
     
  6. Rogallo

    Rogallo Veteran

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    And how long have I been working under a bankruptcy contract negotiated by the great TWU?

    Throw them stones!
     
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  7. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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    No. Just agreeing with what bigjets posted. I did not set out to attack as you suggested.
    This asso. has a history of doing so in the past as they have already done it during these current contract nego's.
    Again not attacking, just agreeing with others observations made, big difference...
     
  8. WeAAsles

    WeAAsles Veteran

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    swamt I can just as easily come back over to your thread and agree with posters who put your Union down but I would prefer not too. I can also say that you should rid yourself of your Union but what purpose are any of us really serving by doing that?

    I’d rather not elaborate further because all it does is ramp up the levels of mutual confrontation.
     
  9. WeAAsles

    WeAAsles Veteran

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    A Law That Changed The Airline Industry Beyond Recognition (1978)
    by Madhu Unnikrishnan
    Jun 04, 2015

    On Oct. 24, 1978, when President Jimmy Carter signed the Airline Deregulation Act, the airline industry changed forever, and it can be argued we’re feeling the repercussions still to this day. The Deregulation Act eventually dissolved the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB), which regulated U.S. airlines like a public utility, setting where they could fly and what fares they could charge. Without the CAB’s guaranteed rate of return, many storied airlines – Pan Am, Eastern Air Lines, Braniff International – found they couldn’t compete in the new world of open markets and eventually were consigned to the dustbin of aviation history.

    Before Deregulation, airlines competed on service alone, as fares were regulated by the government. Many remember this era fondly as the “golden age of aviation,” when stewardesses—as flight attendants were then known—carved chateaubriand on rolling silver carts and airlines put piano lounges in the upper decks of their Boeing 747s. Passengers dressed up to board flights, and flying was glamorous and exciting—and mainly for the rich.

    Deregulation resulted in the rise of a new kind of airline—the low-cost carrier (LCC). At the time of Deregulation, Southwest Airlines was a small regional airline, prevented by CAB rules from flying outside of Texas. Today, Southwest is the largest domestic U.S. carrier in terms of passenger traffic, something no one could have foreseen in 1978.

    Southwest is a success story, but Deregulation allowed airlines to innovate new business models. People Express may have come and gone (and may someday be revived) but it, and others like it shook up the white-glove world of the U.S. airline industry and democratized travel. We may peer through our rose-colored glasses and yearn for the days of chateaubriand and piano lounges, but ultimately companies like Southwest, and newer ones like Spirit, allowed more people to fly more often.

    Deregulation left the international carriers, like Pan Am and Braniff, and to a lesser extent Trans World Airlines, without robust domestic feeder networks, and it allowed domestic carriers, like Delta Air Lines, to apply for international routes. Pan Am and Braniff scrambled to create domestic networks but ultimately were unsuccessful, although it took until 2000 for TWA to be absorbed into American Airlines.

    And some argue that the massive consolidation of the U.S. airline industry in the last decade, which has resulted in three large carriers —four, when Southwest is included—is Deregulation’s final act. The network carriers that survive—Delta, United and American—learned to be tough competitors, and combined existing domestic networks with the international networks acquired in large part from carriers like Pan Am that didn’t make it.
     
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  10. WeAAsles

    WeAAsles Veteran

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    "Forty years ago, this landmark legislation ushered in a new era of consumer choice, affordable fares and customer value for millions of Americans," said A4A President and CEO Nick Calio. "Competition in the industry is driving airfares down to historic lows. Just last week, the Bureau of Transportation and Statistics announced that in real terms average domestic airfare was $349 in the second quarter of 2018 -- the lowest second quarter on record."


    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-rel...f-the-airline-deregulation-act-300736722.html


    http://airlines.org/blog/40-years-later-how-the-airline-deregulation-act-came-to-pass-part-i/
     
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  11. Rogallo

    Rogallo Veteran

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    Objection....irrelevant!
     
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  12. WeAAsles

    WeAAsles Veteran

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  13. WeAAsles

    WeAAsles Veteran

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  14. Rogallo

    Rogallo Veteran

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    WEAK!
     
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