Cabin crew safety/security breaches

Discussion in 'Aviation Chatter' started by jimntx, Dec 7, 2015.


  1. jimntx

    jimntx Veteran

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    Interesting article about passenger observance of blatant safety/security breaches by flight attendants.  Author was wondering should she have said something to the flight attendant and/or written the airline or FAA.  Example: she observed a flight attendant sleeping on the jumpseat during takeoff--not sitting on the jumpseat with eyes closed.  Sleeping on the jumpseat--to the point of slumping over in the shoulder straps.  I say both incidents mentioned in the article should at least be reported to the airline.  A note to the FAA wouldn't hurt either.  A lot of flight attendants seem to believe that the FAA won't do anything to them for ignoring FARs.
     
    I would not have bothered with speaking to the flight attendant directly.  That's just asking for the rest of your trip to be hell on earth.   :lol:
     
    What say you?
     
     
    http://atwonline.com/blog/cabin-crew-and-safety-security-breaches#comment-35841
     
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  2. Hatu

    Hatu Veteran

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    With a cell phone she could have documented the incidents by video taping them.

    Out of jumpseat on landing and falling asleep on jumpseat are obviously big no-no's.

    I am a little worried if people like her become to proactive: Over my career, as I am sure with your career Jim, I have deadheaded and non-rev'd on the jumpseat while in uniform. I have fallen asleep on the jumpseat while deadheading and non-reving in uniform. The last thing I want is a pax. like her waking me up every ten minutes wondering why I am sleeping.
     
  3. jimntx

    jimntx Veteran

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    Well, technically even when we are deadheading/non-revving OUT of uniform, we're not supposed to sleep on the jumpseat.  But, like you, I have fallen asleep following one of our infamous 13 hour days.  In this case though, remember that the author is well-versed in the airline industry, and she obviously knew that the sleeper was a "working" member of the crew.
     
    Though sleeping on the jumpseat is just about the ultimate no-no, I was a lot more concerned about the f/a taking the 2 bottles of water to the cockpit and then standing and chatting with the cockpit crew for several minutes with the cockpit door wide open.  The author said that it was not a U.S-based airline, and she didn't mention if they were flying within U.S airspace or not; so, there's no way of telling if cockpit security regulations were in effect.  But, it just seems to me that unless you hadn't heard about 9/11, keeping the cockpit door open for extended periods is not good common sense.
     

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