United Engine Failure On Takeoff (777)

Discussion in 'United Airlines' started by swamt, Feb 21, 2021.

  1. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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    WoW! Glad no one was hurt on ground and in the air. How different this could have been. Once one guy reported the inlet at approx 15' in diameter I figured it must have been the 777. Then I found the video below with live in flight after engine failure...

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/plane-parts-fall-colorado-neighborhood-000801875.html
     
  2. delldude

    delldude Veteran

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    The video from a cabin window says a lot, especially for freaked out passengers. Yoi.
    I'm waiting to hear what went on, whether it was internal failure or an external ingestion. No doubt things got out of balance real soon.....especially shedding external tin and what not. HAven't heard any reports of debris going through the fuselage.....yet.

    This vid, good shot of the fan.

     
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  3. robbedagain

    robbedagain Veteran

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    Kudos to flight crew getting it down quickly. Thank God no injuries or death
     
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  4. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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    All 777's with the P&W engines are now grounded for inspections.
    As robbed said the crew did excellent getting her down safely.
    I too am curious to the cause. Usually we would have heard something if it were in ingestion of birds but not saying it wasn't.
    This will be huge if it's an internal failure again.
     
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  5. delldude

    delldude Veteran

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    Looking like hollow comp blades. Someone possibly miss a blade root indication in NDT?

    Hey, type certification on single engine ops was great.
     
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  6. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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    Excellent guess delldude. According to this article they have already found two damaged locations; Blade root and @ mid span. Another metal fatigue issue once again. Engine manufacturers will have to step up inspections more than likely for all engine blade inspects. Or might they just suggest on the higher output engines? Delta also just had an engine problem...

    https://www.yahoo.com/gma/damaged-fan-blade-united-engine-024600020.html

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/delta-flight-makes-emergency-landing-002203419.html
     
  7. delldude

    delldude Veteran

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    I don't know who does their NDT, pretty sure United is in house. They do those with an eddy current probe and liquid penetrant. That Sioux City fan, NDT guy missed an indication.
     
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  8. xUT

    xUT Veteran

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    #8 xUT, Feb 23, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021
    It has been awhile and all my old coworkers have retired or laid off.
    From UA Tech Ops:
    Engines

    Test cell is pretty awesome.

    IIRC if UA is overloaded with engine work, they send them to P&W for overhaul so it could be either one.

    Why Do Boeing 777 Engines Keep Exploding?

    pw4000.png


    Looks like it could be a P&W issue.
    Wait for the NTSB & FAA ruling.
    JMHO xUT
     
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  9. WraithPath

    WraithPath Newbie

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    You can immediately see the level of professionalism of the crew saved all the passengers, well done!!
     
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  10. delldude

    delldude Veteran

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    We had a pretty nice cell at Pit. Was the best one on the east coast IIRC....State of the art, also had the old cell, was a good cell but kind of a clunker. Couldn't handle anything beyond a JT8.
     
  11. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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    Surely they don't still mag part. inspect still? I would think they would use imaging and or x-ray now days. Picks up more and penetrates deeper. Not my area of expertise but they must have a better means by now.
    xUT posted that United started using thermal acoustic imaging in 2005. But that don't mean someone still didn't see it. Maybe it was so slight that it took a big load full of passengers payload and fuel at takeoff loads for the failure to happen. Not blaming anyone here. Just thinking out loud.


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/photos-boeing-777-engine-failed-122426126.html
     
  12. delldude

    delldude Veteran

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    I don't know what they are doing, I'm sure on wing inspections on the blades, at least. That would be Eddy Current and/or Liquid Penetrant if they find suspect blades and change them out individually...which would go to their NDT shop for TI. They may have blade sets ready to swap out too.

    The order means fan blades will need to be shipped to Pratt & Whitney for thermal acoustic imaging tests, the company said in a statement. About 125 Boeing 777 aircraft are powered by the PW4000-112 engine covered under the directive.

    The previous inspection interval for Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines was 6,500 flight cycles. A flight cycle is defined as one takeoff and landing.

    https://time.com/5941994/faa-grounds-boeing-777-engine/

    That's one helluva lot of cycles.
     
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  13. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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    Good info and thanks for the link.
    so original inspection was set at 6500 cycles. In my earlier post I said they would more than likely set a lower or sooner time frame of inspections going forward thinking they might cut the 6500 in half. Well they did way more than that, according to the article below they are moving inspections all the way up to 1000 cycles. WOW! Big move IMO, but I like the move. Never thought they would up the inspections by 85%. Now that may taper off as they get through a number of repeats and might move the inspections to a new time frame of, IDK, maybe what 2500-3000 cycles? Who knows.
    Your right, 6500 IS a lot of cycles IMO for the loads on these big engines.

    https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/united-777-plane-flew-fewer-040941874.html
     
  14. xUT

    xUT Veteran

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    That's why the FAA is known as the Tombstone Agency.
    Manufactures give their 'best educated guess' on MTBF when certified and increase it YOY because there wasn't a failure. We have seen this many times.
    Yes, the inspection rate will be reduced and the FAA `will close the case.
    Fortunately, no one died this time.
    JMHO & PO xUT
     
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  15. swamt

    swamt Veteran

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