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What Age To Retire With Lifetime Travel?


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25 replies to this topic

#1
Salty Dog

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I've heard a few different scenarios
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#2
amt66

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I believe it's 10 years if service and 50 years old but not 100% positive
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#3
JAFI

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You must be a retiree, and not just drawing a pension. So, you can retire at 55, or under the 50/55 rule you can leave at 50 and retire anytime after 55 (if you have enough years in service). But, you will not have travel benefits until you draw your pension.

Of coarse, this is for TWU. Not sure if the F/A or pilots have different deals.
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#4
IORFA

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Sounds the same for F/A's as well.
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#5
jimntx

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There are some "early out" scenarios where you get travel for a certain number of years after your departure, but as stated above for just a regular retirement, as long as you have 10 years on the payroll, you get lifetime travel benefits. I was furloughed for 17 months; so, I have an "adjusted" company seniority date. I started in 2000, but my company seniority date (used to determine retiree benefits other than pension) is January, 2002.
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#6
eolesen

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Travel, aside from the Article 30 program Jim mentioned for FA's, is not contractual, so eligibility is the same across the company: no travel until you retire.

For the most part, that's been the date at which you inform HR you want to draw your pension, but agents and management had the option to convert to the 401K in 2001, and that's something that the company doesn't control, so it's really clear to me how that will work going forward.

As an aside, the calculation for determining 10 years of service is cumulative.

If I want retiree travel, all I have to do is interview to be a CSM, get back on payroll for 15 days, and then "retire" anytime after my 50th birthday.

Not sure how US/HP/AL/PI/PS/ managed that in the past, but I know that TW/EA/OC/QQ seniority was credited for those employees who started elsewhere.
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#7
Bob Owens

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There are some "early out" scenarios where you get travel for a certain number of years after your departure, but as stated above for just a regular retirement, as long as you have 10 years on the payroll, you get lifetime travel benefits. I was furloughed for 17 months; so, I have an "adjusted" company seniority date. I started in 2000, but my company seniority date (used to determine retiree benefits other than pension) is January, 2002.


I think you have to have 10 years AND be over 50 when you leave to get flight benefits when you start collecting your pension, earliest age 55 (unless awarded a Disability pension which really exists only on paper-they really dont give it out, if you qualify for it most likely you are in no condition to travel).
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#8
bob@las-AA

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I think you have to have 10 years AND be over 50 when you leave to get flight benefits when you start collecting your pension, earliest age 55 (unless awarded a Disability pension which really exists only on paper-they really dont give it out, if you qualify for it most likely you are in no condition to travel).

10 years of service, and 55 years of age for free flight. Now if you took the 50 and 55 he had to wait until 55 to gain the flight.

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#9
jimntx

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Well, the age goes without saying because you can't draw your pension earlier than age 50 regardless of number of years of service. (Well, I imagine there would be an exception if you had an IOD that resulted in permanent disability.)
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#10
UPNAWAY

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At US it is not tied to collecting a pension at all. Just age + years of service must equal 65 or more i.e. 10 years and be 55.
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#11
Bob Owens

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At US it is not tied to collecting a pension at all. Just age + years of service must equal 65 or more i.e. 10 years and be 55.


So you could be 42 years old with 23 years and keep Flight Benefits if you leave the company?
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#12
dash8roa

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At US it is not tied to collecting a pension at all. Just age + years of service must equal 65 or more i.e. 10 years and be 55.


At US if hired before jan-1-2003, 55 years of are and 5 years of service.
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