A thank you to a PHL-GSO pilot on 2/1/03

ScottishWitch

Member
Dec 20, 2002
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I don''t think this gets said enough, but to the pilot of the last flight from PHL to GSO, Saturday night 2/1/03- THANK YOU!
I was cold, tired and hungry as we approached GSO. I had nearly frozen to death in Boston and all I wanted to do was go home. I ached. I saw the runway lights come up and braced myself. Landing never was my favorite part. I waited for the bump and bounce. It never came.
It was as smooth as glass. I blinked and thought Did that just happen? It was like a hand reached out of the sky and set us neatly on the runway as if to say There you are! I''m certainly no expert, and I realize that there are many factors that make for a perfect landing. But I also thought about how exacting your job is and how much it must take to do that. And I just wanted to say thanks for taking that time and that effort to make the flight a truly great one. My daughter would wake up if you dropped a feather on the carpet. She was sound asleep when we pulled up to the gate. Thanks so much.
 

PHL

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
1,658
57
That, my friend, is affectionately known in pilot circles as a "greaser". Something all pilots strive for on every landing.
 

drifterreno

Veteran
Aug 21, 2002
611
3
During the summer months and fair weather I can always tell if a pilot flew for the air force or navy. Air force pilots tend to have those long smooth landings where possible and navy pilots tend to stick it short--comes from landing on air craft carriers. Also in the winter months and ice and snow the pilots tend to "stick" it hard so as to not skid on the ice. Don't know if all of this is real or just speculation but it works for me when there's a "hard" landing.
 
OP
S

ScottishWitch

Member
Dec 20, 2002
20
0
[blockquote]
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On 2/3/2003 12:46:02 PM ITRADE wrote:

Or, observe any landing at SAN, SNA, or DCA.
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I remember back in 1989 British Airways used to fly a 747 into SAN. It didn't last long, but my heart always went out to the poor pilot who had to make THAT landing!
 

delldude

Veteran
Oct 29, 2002
28,365
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Downrange
www.youtube.com
turn her into the wind,i've got aircraft to launch...................
 

ITRADE

Veteran
Aug 19, 2002
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DCA/IAD US2
www.geocities.com
United used to fly a 747-100 or -200 SAN-LAX-HNL.

The BA flight was LGW-PHX-SAN, so it didn't have all the fuel and weight that a full flight would have.

The BA 777 SAN-LGW flight is a different story.
 

AtlanticBeach

Senior
Aug 20, 2002
341
2
[blockquote]
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On 2/4/2003 7:43:31 AM ITRADE wrote:

United used to fly a 747-100 or -200 SAN-LAX-HNL.

The BA flight was LGW-PHX-SAN, so it didn't have all the fuel and weight that a full flight would have.

The BA 777 SAN-LGW flight is a different story.
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[/blockquote]

Take off from SAN fully loaded for LGW? No sweat.

Just apply full power as you exit I-5, watch out for the car rental places and the Westin on your left.
 

ITRADE

Veteran
Aug 19, 2002
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DCA/IAD US2
www.geocities.com
[blockquote]
----------------
On 2/4/2003 8:28:25 AM AtlanticBeach wrote:

[blockquote]
----------------
On 2/4/2003 7:43:31 AM ITRADE wrote:

United used to fly a 747-100 or -200 SAN-LAX-HNL.

The BA flight was LGW-PHX-SAN, so it didn't have all the fuel and weight that a full flight would have.

The BA 777 SAN-LGW flight is a different story.
----------------
[/blockquote]

Take off from SAN fully loaded for LGW? No sweat.

Just apply full power as you exit I-5, watch out for the car rental places and the Westin on your left.

Really, it is just incredible technology if an airplane filled with people can make that trip non-stop.
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[/blockquote]

Theoretically, could a fully loaded 777 depart safely off Runway 9 at SAN?

Seems like a very steep ascent.
 

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