Beer cans in the making

Aug 20, 2002
3,270
306
www.usaviation.com
One of the first 757s off the line meets its end:

http://www.airliners...-225/2110173/L/

and in happier days:

http://www.airliners...5b27dff544e87d8

wearing the blue top:


http://www.airliners...5b27dff544e87d8



This was one of the former Eastern 757s that US picked up around '91 and '92. It was, back in the day, kind of cool thing. Remember ship 610 "Ideas that Fly". And 604 "Christine". Once, after a maintenance delay was announced, a Gold Preferred pax asked: Is it aircraft 610?" in that case, rebook me via CLT".
 

FWAAA

Veteran
Jan 5, 2003
10,251
3,900
My guess is you get more beer cans out of a Boeing than an Airbus.
While you may be right, I would have guessed that narrowbody Airbus would yield more beer cans per plane due to the (generally) higher empty operating weights of the A320 family compared to the comparable 737 model.
 

nycbusdriver

Veteran
Dec 19, 2002
7,951
5,574
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While you may be right, I would have guessed that narrowbody Airbus would yield more beer cans per plane due to the (generally) higher empty operating weights of the A320 family compared to the comparable 737 model.

Good point. The narrow-body Airbuses are quite a bit heavier than the equivalent-seat Boeings. Actually, the Airbuses are not technically "narrow" body, but "standard" body according to Airbus, and hence more comfortable.
 

snapthis

Veteran
Dec 23, 2009
4,236
6,907
Goes to a better use in that case, anyway.

The carbon fibers in an Airbus would be better suited for tennis racquets, golf club shafts, fishing poles and Skiing equipment. If I was going to be recycled, put me on the golf course.
 

700UW

Corn Field
Nov 11, 2003
37,637
19,488
NC

Material breakout on 787


  • Composites - 50%
  • Aluminum - 20%
  • Titanium - 15%
  • Steel - 10%
  • Other - 5%