Beware trying to Non-rev from Texas

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It’s hard to Non Rev anywhere period because the Airlines are both short on Airplanes and have learned the best ways to price the product to get maximum capacity.

Dynamic pricing

They are short on airplanes because the government is using them to transport border jumping vermin NORTH.
 
I don't forget when people I pay money to (through UNION dues) to protect MY interest try to f*ck me over. I also don't forget when they try to blame shift the result of their actions on me. I have a real long memory for that kind of BS.

And do you really think there’s anyone left who cares? You’re never going to catch that White Whale of yours Captain Ahab.

Spark Notes:

“Ahab, the Pequod’s obsessed captain, represents both an ancient and a quintessentially modern type of hero. Like the heroes of Greek or Shakespearean tragedy, Ahab suffers from a single fatal flaw, one he shares with such legendary characters as Oedipus and Faust. His tremendous overconfidence, or hubris, leads him to defy common sense and believe that, like a god, he can enact his will and remain immune to the forces of nature. He considers Moby Dick the embodiment of evil in the world, and he pursues the White Whale monomaniacally because he believes it his inescapable fate to destroy this evil. According to the critic M. H. Abrams, such a tragic hero “moves us to pity because, since he is not an evil man, his misfortune is greater than he deserves; but he moves us also to fear, because we recognize similar possibilities of error in our own lesser and fallible selves.”

Unlike the heroes of older tragic works, however, Ahab suffers from a fatal flaw that is not necessarily inborn but instead stems from damage, in his case both psychological and physical, inflicted by life in a harsh world. He is as much a victim as he is an aggressor, and the symbolic opposition that he constructs between himself and Moby Dick propels him toward what he considers a destined end”
 
And do you really think there’s anyone left who cares? You’re never going to catch that White Whale of yours Captain Ahab.

Spark Notes:

“Ahab, the Pequod’s obsessed captain, represents both an ancient and a quintessentially modern type of hero. Like the heroes of Greek or Shakespearean tragedy, Ahab suffers from a single fatal flaw, one he shares with such legendary characters as Oedipus and Faust. His tremendous overconfidence, or hubris, leads him to defy common sense and believe that, like a god, he can enact his will and remain immune to the forces of nature. He considers Moby Dick the embodiment of evil in the world, and he pursues the White Whale monomaniacally because he believes it his inescapable fate to destroy this evil. According to the critic M. H. Abrams, such a tragic hero “moves us to pity because, since he is not an evil man, his misfortune is greater than he deserves; but he moves us also to fear, because we recognize similar possibilities of error in our own lesser and fallible selves.”

Unlike the heroes of older tragic works, however, Ahab suffers from a fatal flaw that is not necessarily inborn but instead stems from damage, in his case both psychological and physical, inflicted by life in a harsh world. He is as much a victim as he is an aggressor, and the symbolic opposition that he constructs between himself and Moby Dick propels him toward what he considers a destined end”
I don't give a sh*t if anyone else cares. I care.

I'm not hunting Sam. I just don't have any use for the sorry bastard. I also don't want people to forget what a PoS he is because, if he will screw over a whole shop of people, it's not beyond him to take advantage of someone else in the future.
 
I don't give a sh*t if anyone else cares. I care.

I'm not hunting Sam. I just don't have any use for the sorry bastard. I also don't want people to forget what a PoS he is because, if he will screw over a whole shop of people, it's not beyond him to take advantage of someone else in the future.

Well whatever I guess. Time is ticking away and soon we’ll all be retiring. It’s your obsession no one’s paying any attention to anyway and like a security blanket you can wrap yourself in anything you like. Sorry your life didn’t go the way you wanted it to.
 
This sounds more like it. Airlines are selling walk up tickets to non profits who are giving those tickets to Migrants to go where they want. Our Airlines are for profit businesses so they’d much rather sell a seat to whoever then leave them open to “non revenue” employees and their registered guests.


 
I don't give a sh*t if anyone else cares. I care.

I'm not hunting Sam. I just don't have any use for the sorry bastard. I also don't want people to forget what a PoS he is because, if he will screw over a whole shop of people, it's not beyond him to take advantage of someone else in the future.
So non-revving out of San Antonio is pretty rough, eh?
 
And do you really think there’s anyone left who cares? You’re never going to catch that White Whale of yours Captain Ahab.

Spark Notes:

“Ahab, the Pequod’s obsessed captain, represents both an ancient and a quintessentially modern type of hero. Like the heroes of Greek or Shakespearean tragedy, Ahab suffers from a single fatal flaw, one he shares with such legendary characters as Oedipus and Faust. His tremendous overconfidence, or hubris, leads him to defy common sense and believe that, like a god, he can enact his will and remain immune to the forces of nature. He considers Moby Dick the embodiment of evil in the world, and he pursues the White Whale monomaniacally because he believes it his inescapable fate to destroy this evil. According to the critic M. H. Abrams, such a tragic hero “moves us to pity because, since he is not an evil man, his misfortune is greater than he deserves; but he moves us also to fear, because we recognize similar possibilities of error in our own lesser and fallible selves.”

Unlike the heroes of older tragic works, however, Ahab suffers from a fatal flaw that is not necessarily inborn but instead stems from damage, in his case both psychological and physical, inflicted by life in a harsh world. He is as much a victim as he is an aggressor, and the symbolic opposition that he constructs between himself and Moby Dick propels him toward what he considers a destined end”
It occured to me you may lack the literary sophistication to describe your analysis. Most likely what you are alluding is I am like Inspector Javert pursuing Jean Valjean.

 
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