Buddy Pass suspension

jimntx

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I'm not clear about your question...
Do you mean that an employee lost their Buddy pass privileges? Meaning that the employee can not give out Buddy passes. Or do you mean that an "earth person" (LOL) who was on an employee's list of D3 travelers was removed from the list for violation of some rule(s).

In either case, this sounds like the punishment for a serious infraction of the non-rev travel rules--such as smoking in the lavs, or excessive consumption of alcohol followed by demands for more, or using Buddy passes for business travel. If it's that sort of issue, my guess is those travel privileges can be kissed goodby. I think the company has been very clear over the years as to what is expected in return for the free or almost free travel.

Starting with your supervisor is not a bad idea, but for chrissakes TELL THE TRUTH as to why the privileges were suspended, and don't try to make it the company's fault. I can assure you that whatever incident resulted in the suspension, it has already been written up to the nth degree and lying about your side of the issue will only make things worse (can you say termination?). If you are the employee you must know that you are held responsible for the behavior of your Buddy pass travelers.
 

jimntx

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Just like JREwing, I want to hear the rest of this story. I worked for AA for 15 years and I never heard of someone's pass privileges being cancelled/suspended. Well, except for the time when I was relatively new and cancelled a booking for myself commuting to STL from DFW . I had already checked in as a D2. I cancelled that booking and rebooked as a D1 because the seats were all going to D1s. The gate agent told me (very kindly) that "I can't stop you from doing what you just did, and I will give you a boarding pass if you insist, but I think you should know that what you did is a termination offense for abuse of the non-rev travel rules. I decided to do the smart thing and cancel the D1 booking. BTW, I confirmed with Flight Service management afterward that it was in fact a termination offense, and that the agent had done me a major favor by advising me.
 

swamt

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Oct 23, 2010
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I too would love to hear this story.
I know of someone at our airline that got his passes suspended for selling them for $$$ and yes jim you are correct, he was fired and it held up thru all channels with no appeals. The rules are laid out in the non-rev rules and regs. And jim is also correct that an employee very well can get fired for what someone else does on a non-rev pass if so deemed necessary. This is why I do not pass out my passes to anyone but family. Just not worth the hassle...
 

UPNAWAY

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Aug 17, 2005
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I have a friend whose sister also works at AA, he was listed as her companion. He ask me one day for a guest pass and I was like I thought you had companion passes? He said his sister told him she got her travel benefits suspended. Well I was suspicious of that and gave her a call, turns out she and a boyfriend and had replaced her brother but didn't want to tell him or her family about the new friend just yet....I told her I'd take care of her brother but she better come clean soon or I would spill the beans, lol.:)
 

jimntx

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Another attempt to clear some air. You used the term employee family member in your original post. Do you mean you are the family member who was removed from an employee's non-rev list? Or, that you are the employee who has a family member who was removed from your non-rev list?
 

JREwing

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Feb 11, 2014
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I wouldn't give the OP anymore of your time. It's an internal matter between employee and AA (and that assumes than any of this actually happened)
 

Filter

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Just like JREwing, I want to hear the rest of this story. I worked for AA for 15 years and I never heard of someone's pass privileges being cancelled/suspended. Well, except for the time when I was relatively new and cancelled a booking for myself commuting to STL from DFW . I had already checked in as a D2. I cancelled that booking and rebooked as a D1 because the seats were all going to D1s. The gate agent told me (very kindly) that "I can't stop you from doing what you just did, and I will give you a boarding pass if you insist, but I think you should know that what you did is a termination offense for abuse of the non-rev travel rules. I decided to do the smart thing and cancel the D1 booking. BTW, I confirmed with Flight Service management afterward that it was in fact a termination offense, and that the agent had done me a major favor by advising me.

That’s strange...I’ve been involved as a union rep in dozens of cases of pass abuse resulting in everything from terminations to suspension of travel. Had one case where they allowed the employee to commute but fly nowhere else for 5 years. I always assumed this was fairly common.
 

jimntx

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Well, arent you lucky! I guess flight attendants and pilots (the people I encountered most in a day) were too dependent upon their ability to commute to work via AA and/or AE to risk gaming the system. I never heard any mention of travel privileges being covered by a contract. It was my understanding that it was a "gift" from the airline to the employees--represented or not. If it is, the union should have negotiated better terms--like employees traveling D1 or D2 on their way to work should go ahead of Exec Plats that buy a cheapo coach fare and then expect to be upgraded to First Class on their AAdvantage status. LOL
 
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eolesen

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Jul 23, 2003
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If it went to the extent of HR suspending privileges, there's not much of a chance of appeal. Those decisions aren't made quickly.

I used to be involved in pAAss AAbuse investigAAtions... and yes, it happens quite a bit. We'd see cases where an individual family member would be permanently banned from pass travel due to behavior onboard or at the airport, and usually there'd be some degree of suspension of the employee's privileges, but not always depending on the situation.
 

UPNAWAY

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Aug 17, 2005
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Just like JREwing, I want to hear the rest of this story. I worked for AA for 15 years and I never heard of someone's pass privileges being cancelled/suspended. Well, except for the time when I was relatively new and cancelled a booking for myself commuting to STL from DFW . I had already checked in as a D2. I cancelled that booking and rebooked as a D1 because the seats were all going to D1s. The gate agent told me (very kindly) that "I can't stop you from doing what you just did, and I will give you a boarding pass if you insist, but I think you should know that what you did is a termination offense for abuse of the non-rev travel rules. I decided to do the smart thing and cancel the D1 booking. BTW, I confirmed with Flight Service management afterward that it was in fact a termination offense, and that the agent had done me a major favor by advising me.


BTW that gate agent was wrong or the rule has changed. That's perfectly allowed as long as it is 1 hr prior to departure.
 

jimntx

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BTW that gate agent was wrong or the rule has changed. That's perfectly allowed as long as it is 1 hr prior to departure.
It was less than 1 hour prior to departure. Besides, at the gate, what the agent says are the rules, are the rules. Kinda like when my father used to tell us that the law is what the cop on the beat says it is . Oh, and he said, "Don't EVER tell a policeman [or gate agent for that matter] "You can't do that." (That's what courts are for...to settle such issues.)
 
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mike757

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Feb 14, 2006
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I'm not clear about your question...
Do you mean that an employee lost their Buddy pass privileges? Meaning that the employee can not give out Buddy passes. Or do you mean that an "earth person" (LOL) who was on an employee's list of D3 travelers was removed from the list for violation of some rule(s).

In either case, this sounds like the punishment for a serious infraction of the non-rev travel rules--such as smoking in the lavs, or excessive consumption of alcohol followed by demands for more, or using Buddy passes for business travel. If it's that sort of issue, my guess is those travel privileges can be kissed goodby. I think the company has been very clear over the years as to what is expected in return for the free or almost free travel.

Starting with your supervisor is not a bad idea, but for chrissakes TELL THE TRUTH as to why the privileges were suspended, and don't try to make it the company's fault. I can assure you that whatever incident resulted in the suspension, it has already been written up to the nth degree and lying about your side of the issue will only make things worse (can you say termination?). If you are the employee you must know that you are held responsible for the behavior of your Buddy pass travelers.
I just received a report on a buddy pass Rider who boarded the flight drunk and started verbal altercation with another passenger she was allowed to continue the flight.. as it turns she was alcoholic in recovery who told me she "had a slip-up at the airport" during a lengthy delay.. I've responded telling him that accepted full responsibility for her behavior and it was my lack of judgment allowing her to fly, although in my own defense I was I was unaware she was an alcoholic since we had never had any drinks together and I had not ever smell it on her breath.. I'm assuming they'll terminate my flight benefits.. I just recently took a VEOP..