Dave Siegel interview

Aug 20, 2002
1,423
90
Valhalla
www.usaviation.com
"Today, Siegel's top criterion in hiring key people is their psychological makeup. In interviews, he tries to discern how candidates grew up and made schooling and career choices. He favors individuals with a history of overcoming adversity and thriving under pressure to lift team performance."

Why did Siegel depart from Gate Gourment?? Instead of overcoming adversity he runs from it.
 

BoeingBoy

Veteran
Nov 9, 2003
16,512
5,865
Why did Siegel depart from Gate Gourment??

I guess that nobody outside of the Gate Gourmet board and a few others know for sure, but it's a possibility that he didn't have much choice in the matter. At the top levels of management almost no one is publicly fired, they always leave "for personal reasons" or "to seek other opportunities".

Jim
 

FlyOnWall

Senior
Mar 22, 2004
420
6
If you could pick just one person responsible for the terrible morale at US it would be Jerry Glass. Those two concessions negotiations were painful enough without his confrontational style. He took labor tension and turned it into an all-out us vs. them mentality that has yet to go away. He seemed to relish personifying being the cruel enemy rather than keeping it just business. Apparently he was thrilled when somone coined the term "Jerry's Kids" referring to the "MDA" employees. US made a big statement about how they felt about their employees when they hired this immature jerk. He drove off some great people and left a terrible tone for the remaining ones.
 

700UW

Corn Field
Nov 11, 2003
37,637
19,488
NC
The folks at UA are in for a fun time, Glass and McKeen, the same team that did the concessions at US and NW are leading negotiations for UA's Managment, and like 88% of UA's workforce's CBAs are up for Section 6.
 

Julie

Newbie
Apr 10, 2009
3
0
Sorry, but the article is sour grapes. I was locked in a room with Jerry Glass for the better part of a year and he never once made a negative reference to Dave Siegel. In fact, I thought they were friends until I read the article.

In response to Fly's comments, how can you blame Jerry Glass for poor morale? The majority of those still working must have voted yes. Those of us who voted no eventually elected to vote with our feet. If you need to blame someone, blame yourself and your peers for your working conditions. There is one thing the company can always count on...historically, AFA and IAM fight, while the pilots always roll.
 
E

EastUS

Guest
Sorry, but the article is sour grapes. I was locked in a room with Jerry Glass for the better part of a year and he never once made a negative reference to Dave Siegel. In fact, I thought they were friends until I read the article.

There is one thing the company can always count on...historically, AFA and IAM fight, while the pilots always roll.

1) Agreed. It's ridiculous and even utterly pathetic for a CEO to be whining about being "undermined". If you're the Boss? = BE the Boss....period. No whining allowed.

2) I'm very hopeful that those times have finally changed.
 

700UW

Corn Field
Nov 11, 2003
37,637
19,488
NC
Remember Jerry Glass and his cronies violated the IAM M&R CBA right after the first bankruptcy by outsourcing the A319s to Alabama, hmm, isnt that where Bronner and the RSA is based?

Glass, McKeen and Hemenway single handily destroyed the airline and employee morale, before them it was a good place to work where you enjoyed coming in, after them it was just a job.

And during the second bankruptcy I guess you forgot the Mechanic and Related and Fleet Service had their CBAs abrogated by Judge "rubber stamp" Mitchell.

And I sat in a room with Glass (sometimes), McKeen and Hemenway and I would get kicked off the boards if I really told you what I think about them, McKeen and I just about got into a fist fight in Labor Relations after the abrogation, Hemenway had to step in between us to prevent it from becoming a fist to cuff.
 

Julie

Newbie
Apr 10, 2009
3
0
Piney:

Teddy is a good friend of mine. I was ccd on the many e-mail weekend fights between Teddy and Dave Siegel. These wars started around 8 on Friday. lasted all weekend, and went until midnight on Sunday. Many time Jerry Glass joined in and he always defended Dave Siegel. My point is, Jerry never said a negative word against Dave Siegel in my presence. This article, in my opinion, is nothing but sour grapes.

Are there horror labor relation stories? absolutely. However, that doesn't negate the fact the majority of the employees either voted yes, or elected not to vote at all. And, if you voted yes, or didn't vote at all, you don't have the right to complain. Much the same as Dave Siegel blaming Jerry Glass for his demise, the employees fail to accept their responsibility in their working conditions. I appreciate a 'no' vote could have been a vote for the street; obviously the majority thought 'yes' was preferable to the street and now they must live with the consequences.
 

Kev3188

Veteran
Oct 5, 2003
18,401
9,452
Right in the middle.
There is a very good book out by a former union busting lawyer and Teddy knows the title, I've forgotten but it is wonderful read if you as a union member want to gain insight into how the other side thinks.

This one?

CONFESSION_OF_A_UNION_BUSTER.jpg


if it is, you're right; it is a fantastic read, and one I'd highly recommend.