AA reports pre-tax profit of $1.5 billion excl special items for 2Q17

Still nothing for the folks that keep`em flying. Almost 3700 showed up for the protest at DFW July 26th. I hope to see good turnouts as the picket moves around the system.
 
Good on all those that took the time to picket/protest. no shame at all on the company's part. if they got shot up with truth serum, i'm sure they would tell us that we have to suffer for awhile..it's only business.

that's too easy for them to say, many of us have 1-2-3 contracts left to gather as much as we can for retirement.

as far as the company and it's stock, i'm sure the people at berkshire-hathaway are on the phone and meeting with the company asking them why they should hold 10% of aal with a .40 cent yearly dividend, while delta pays a $1.21 yearly dividend.

aa will double the dividend, they have no choice. buffet starts selling, aal will tank and parker will throw a $hit-fit. aa employees have another obstacle/competitor for money. with aal buying back hundreds of millions of shares, it won't hurt the company. doubling the dividend will cost nearly as much as the original .10 quarterly dividend payments on 755 million shares.
 
off the top of my head, it was dl. their margins (18+%) are the envy of the other legacy carriers. the obvious is their labor costs, i believe only one work group is unionized. in relation to ua+co with roughly the same amount of time post-mergers, they blow them away. in relation to aa+us, give aa the same amount of time post merger to see if aa's post-merger synergies & margins can equal/approach dl+nw margins.

dl seems to have found the right balance of keeping it's employees happy/content and not having to deal with unions. an example is just this past quarter, 2q17. dl set aside $338 million for it's employee profit sharing program...an amount aa won't get near for all of 2017. aa's profit sharing program is paltry and was reactionary to the complaints of it's employees...it also came on the heels of aa giving very generous bonuses (17%) to level 5 and above managers. it was as if aa sheepishly said, "here's a tiny bit of money for you..stop whining".

anyways, good on delta and good for their employees. even more of a stick the aa union negotiators can hit aa with.

as far as margins and the other non-legacy carriers, southwest is the winner. remember, they only have one type of equipment, which saves big money on crews, maintenance, parts...etc..etc. if 2 or 3 737s go down in a week and the faa grounds 737s, southwest has a big problem.

as far as your second question, are you talking about $$? if so, it's aa, by far. aa has $9.3 billion in liquidity..$7 billion of that is cash in it's pocket right now.
 
off the top of my head, it was dl. their margins (18+%) are the envy of the other legacy carriers. the obvious is their labor costs, i believe only one work group is unionized. in relation to ua+co with roughly the same amount of time post-mergers, they blow them away. in relation to aa+us, give aa the same amount of time post merger to see if aa's post-merger synergies & margins can equal/approach dl+nw margins.

dl seems to have found the right balance of keeping it's employees happy/content and not having to deal with unions. an example is just this past quarter, 2q17. dl set aside $338 million for it's employee profit sharing program...an amount aa won't get near for all of 2017. aa's profit sharing program is paltry and was reactionary to the complaints of it's employees...it also came on the heels of aa giving very generous bonuses (17%) to level 5 and above managers. it was as if aa sheepishly said, "here's a tiny bit of money for you..stop whining".

anyways, good on delta and good for their employees. even more of a stick the aa union negotiators can hit aa with.

as far as margins and the other non-legacy carriers, southwest is the winner. remember, they only have one type of equipment, which saves big money on crews, maintenance, parts...etc..etc. if 2 or 3 737s go down in a week and the faa grounds 737s, southwest has a big problem.

as far as your second question, are you talking about $$? if so, it's aa, by far. aa has $9.3 billion in liquidity..$7 billion of that is cash in it's pocket right now.


Thank You for taking the time to post that specific info. !!!!
 
off the top of my head, it was dl. their margins (18+%) are the envy of the other legacy carriers. the obvious is their labor costs, i believe only one work group is unionized. in relation to ua+co with roughly the same amount of time post-mergers, they blow them away. in relation to aa+us, give aa the same amount of time post merger to see if aa's post-merger synergies & margins can equal/approach dl+nw margins.

Two are: Pilots (ALPA), and Dispatchers (PAFCA).

And those low labor costs come at a price- IIRC, we are also the most productive group as well. That's nice for shareholders, but means doing more & more with less & less for the rank and file.
 
i sympathize and understand that dl squeezes more water from a rock than aa or anyone else.

yet..compare your profit sharing and what you have pocketed in addition to your wages and then compare that overall compensation to that of heavily unionized legacy carriers ua & aa. the profit sharing sets you way above.

delta has seems to have found the right balance. carrot and stick. the carrot is big enough and the stick isn't painful enough to compel organization.