Failed drug test termination fleet service please help.

Discussion in 'American Airlines' started by Micificent28, Jan 16, 2020.

  1. La Li Lu Le Lo

    La Li Lu Le Lo Veteran

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    Micificent28

    May I ask how old you are (within 3 years, do not give exact age)?

    Do you have any training or education to fall back on (yes or no do not go into specifics)?

    Does your area offer many job opportunities (do NOT list where you work if you have not already)?

    One last bit of advice..... watch what you say on here. The company DOES monitor these forums. I know that for a FACT. Be VERY careful about the info you share about yourself and others.
     
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  2. B777master

    B777master Member

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  3. Micificent28

    Micificent28 Newbie

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    I'm 38. and no this has been all hands on deck for me as far as a future i assumed at the time this was as good as it gets for a guy without training or advanced education. I think my area is pretty decent as far as opportunities,Not at the top but not bottom tier. Was hoping this would be my life career.
     
  4. La Li Lu Le Lo

    La Li Lu Le Lo Veteran

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    You see Micificent28, that is the trap that is American Airlines. You make good money while you are here but if you get laid off or lose your job what you do here is not marketable.

    I found myself in a job loss situation at American Airlines as well.

    I used to be in Fleet Service at TULE. That is American Airlines maintenance base in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I saw a lot of smoke that suggested they were going to get rid of our shop or at least massively cut back personnel. This encouraged me to go to school. Unfortunately they got rid of us while I was still in the middle of my training.

    Basically I had 4 options. exercise my bumping rights, most likely to a high cost of living area like Miami, put in a transfer to another station and wait for my transfer to go through, put a transfer in locally to another department and title group and start my seniority over, or leave the company, continue my schooling, and attempt to start another career.

    I chose the last option but I don't mind telling you the prospect was very scary. I was topped out at $21.16 at the time with full benefits. That is a very good wage here in Tulsa, OK as this is a low cost of living area. The average income here is $27,313 per resident, so as you can see a ‭$43,166 per year job is highly sought after. In fact that wage exceeds the household average of $41,957 a year.

    American for me when I started was like hitting the jackpot. I had some electrical training but mostly I had one dead end job after another before American Airlines. There was a future in electrical but I felt at the time that American just offered a better deal given the benefits package and pension.

    I, like you, basically had the intent of turning American Airlines into a career. I had the same thought go through my head that you did " I assumed at the time this was as good as it gets for a guy without training or advanced education".

    I learned 2 lessons while employed at American Airlines, or more accurately AFTER being employed at American Airlines.

    Number one, when I targeted a new career I looked for one that could provide me upward mobility. The problem with American Airlines is you are pretty much going to be doing the same job the day you retire as the day you started. Oh you may work up to crew chief but that will be the extent of your mobility. Unless of course you are willing to start your occupational seniority over, which most with any time are not willing to do unless forced.

    Number two, I targeted a skill set that did not lock me into an employer. Working as an electrician for American Airlines for instance allows for a variety of employers, working as a Fleet Service Clerk provides very few if any and all of them very low paying.

    I don't say this to offend. I say it as someone who faced the same scary situation of having to start over and the realizations I had while in that situation.

    IF (and I hope you do get your job back) you do start a new career I hope the lessons I learned and shared can help guide you when making decisions about your future career prospects or encourage you to develop a plan B in case you find yourself in this situation ever again at American Airlines.

    For what it's worth I am doing very well post American Airlines. I am sure you will to.
     
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  5. Micificent28

    Micificent28 Newbie

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    Thanks man, and your absolutely right. I appreicate your well thought out post and it did give me a great amount of insight. I need to think of a post american strategy just as you said.
     
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  6. La Li Lu Le Lo

    La Li Lu Le Lo Veteran

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    What would you like to do if you were not working for American Airlines?

    Would you prefer blue or white collar work? Something local or would you like to travel? Do you value uniqueness in tasks or do you prefer something more repetitive?

    Does your city have registered apprenticeship programs in your city? A lot of these companies will send you to school as part of your apprenticeship. My company sent me to ABC (Associate Builders and Contractors) apprenticeship program for electrical training (this was before I worked for American Airlines).

    Does your city offer free training? Here in Tulsa you can get free training for CNC machining, diesel mechanic, CNA, A+, CDL, welding, etc. I am sure your city has some program like that.

    Do you have friends that work in industries that you are interested in that can help you "break into" the market? Sometimes all you need is ambition and a contact.

    When looking at jobs if you are interested but you seem unqualified apply anyway. Many times an employer casts a "wide net" and literally no one could meet those qualifications. Often times it is more of a wish list than a requirement. IT is notorious for that. (seriously look at an IT job post some time, the ask is ridiculous beyond belief)

    And this is the most important thing I can say....... If you read nothing else read this section. Be very weary of contract labor companies. Sometimes called temp services. I say this for 2 reasons. Number 1, a contract company is basically a parasite that takes a cut from your check before you ever see it. At that point you are basically working to make 2 entities profitable, the company seeking labor and the contract company. You will get low balled every time, guaranteed. Number 2, and this is EXTREMELY important, if the contract company is not providing you work it is almost impossible to collect unemployment because they will tell the government you ARE currently employed but between assignments. DO NOT let yourself get caught up in that trap. Just to simplify...... avoid contract companies like the plague.

    The last thing I would suggest is ask yourself what prospects an employer offers you. Don't just look at the jobs they have available or the one you are applying for but look at future potential. Here is an example. If you go to work for a family ran company your prospects are probably not good because anytime a favorable position comes up it will most likely be staffed with a family member. Here is another, if you go to work for a small established company your prospects are probably not very good because the company has few positions and because the company is mature the upper positions have been and will be filled for the foreseeable future. Most companies like this are good for teaching you skills to secure a position at another employer, nothing more. For instance if you take a job at a small, well established, electrical contractor take the job and learn, then move along to an employer with more prospects. In this instance the prospect at the small electrical contractor is training, which is actually very valuable.

    In my opinion the best companies to target are startups, mostly because that is a good time to wedge yourself into an upper position and/or make a name for yourself (it's easier to stand out in a small work force, especially if you take a leadership role or become a go to guy), or large corporations, which tend to have frequent openings in higher tier positions.

    Anyway, I am sorry if I am droning on but since my career came to an end at American Airlines my perspective on employment has changed. I only share because my viewpoint was so radically altered and I suspect yours may be radically altered as well in the very near future. I am trying to show you a shortcut for what took me months of reflection and realization. I think if I knew or considered 20 years ago what I do today it would have saved me a lot of struggling and wasted time. I am in a good place now career wise and financially but it was hell getting here.
     
  7. overhauler

    overhauler Member

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    I know for a fact that at least one mechanic in Tulsa has failed a random drug test twice, and is still fully employed. He's a family member. I don't know if he signed a termination letter the first go around, but he definitely signed one the last. I'd say it's probably not the norm, case by case basis, and perhaps some dumb luck.
     
  8. La Li Lu Le Lo

    La Li Lu Le Lo Veteran

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    Was he "smokin' the wacky tobacky"?
     
  9. dfw gen

    dfw gen Veteran

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    Thats why i went from stores to a/c main. Let american train and i have a skill if meeded
     
  10. La Li Lu Le Lo

    La Li Lu Le Lo Veteran

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    #55 La Li Lu Le Lo, Jan 18, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2020
    See your thinking. Good on you.

    You have 2 things to fall on.

    Warehouse work, and maybe auditing for your time in stores. Speaking of, did you get any experience on a forklift or get certified on a forklift?

    And A/C maintenance provides you a host of disciplines such an pneumatics, hydraulics, electrical, sheet metal fabrication, and of course diesel engine technology. I may even be missing a few things.
     
  11. La Li Lu Le Lo

    La Li Lu Le Lo Veteran

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    I know of 2 people that turned trade jobs into six figure incomes working for themselves and by themselves.

    One was a carpenter. Only this was no ordinary carpenter. This guy built things but he also carved them in intricate detail (think carved walls or stair cases). He drives a truck much like a moving van that contains all of his tools. Often times he just parks his truck at the residence (the people that hire him are usually very wealthy and have a lot of area to park) and works from sun up to past sun down. When he finishes a job he just loads up his truck and drives on to the next job. He does not own a home as he is always on the road but he is, without a doubt, a very wealthy man.

    The second was a guy that worked for himself installing drop ceilings. This guy was so fast he became the talk of the job site. We just could not believe how fast he was, especially for working solo. We were actually kind of laughing at him before because we could not see how he could do such a large job as a one man crew but, after the first day nobody was laughing.

    Sometimes (rarely) you just run into legendary people that are really good at what they do and they charge a premium for their services.

    My cousin took a job at a weld shop grinding and deburring metal (and whatever other crap job they had for him). He stayed on his own time after work and practiced welding on scrap. He eventually passed welding tests and became a welder in a weld shop. Later he went to work on an oil pipeline as an inspector. So he took a low paying, non skilled job and turned it into a 100K+ a year job without the benefit of formal training or education.

    So see, sometimes you have to look past the mundane and low pay and see potential. Careers are a lot like marriage in that way. :D :D :D
     
  12. 1986Mekanic

    1986Mekanic Senior

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    Nobody takes 1 pill and rings the bell on a random. I say to the original poster, you should think about being accountable to yourself and your family. Then and only then, can you restart your life in whatever direction it goes..
     
  13. eolesen

    eolesen Veteran

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    He said he was in an accident on the job, and that’s usually an automatic tap.
     
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  14. La Li Lu Le Lo

    La Li Lu Le Lo Veteran

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    Is that your professional opinion doctor? :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
     
  15. Micificent28

    Micificent28 Newbie

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    This is what happened. No random test. It's weird because I had a former grievance guy yell me he had been in 3 accidents where he was hit and not 1 drug test.
     

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