American Airlines accelerates 737 deliveries

FA Mikey

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Aug 19, 2002
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American Airlines Inc., a unit of AMR Corp. , said Wednesday it has accelerated its fleet renewal plan by beginning the replacement process for part of its MD-80 fleet. American said it has notified Boeing Co. of its plans to begin pulling forward the delivery of 47 Boeing 737-800 aircraft under a previously existing purchase agreement. Fort Worth, Texas-based American said it has informed Boeing that the airline will take delivery in early 2009 of three 737s previously scheduled for delivery in 2016. In addition, American said it plans to continue pulling forward deliveries of the other 737s from their current 2013-2016 delivery schedules into the 2009-2012 timeframe.
 
Only surprise is that they're not considering -700's at all. There's way too much of a gap between 70 seaters (which they only have a limited supply of) and the 140+ now 150+ with 738's seats.
 
AA's not a big fan of having subfleets. You don't get any relief as far as minimum FA crewing, so the only advantage with the -700 is the lower weight. The disadvantage is that you don't have as much flexibility in maintenance routings or equipment swaps.
 
AA's not a big fan of having subfleets. You don't get any relief as far as minimum FA crewing, so the only advantage with the -700 is the lower weight. The disadvantage is that you don't have as much flexibility in maintenance routings or equipment swaps.

I think if boeing could give an accelerated delivery by taking both -700/800's, AA might actually go that route. But SW probably has the -700 line pumping out at full capacity, they are still taking on about 2 or so planes per month, IIRC.
 
the airline will take delivery in early 2009 of three 737s previously scheduled for delivery in 2016. In addition, American said it plans to continue pulling forward deliveries of the other 737s from their current 2013-2016 delivery schedules into the 2009-2012 timeframe.

Thats two years before the first "replacement" tin shows up. What indication is there that those 80s will last that long let alone much longer at all - do they make that much duct tape?

Is there any special additional training required in the cockpit to pilot the 700 or are they all pretty much the same?
 
I think if boeing could give an accelerated delivery by taking both -700/800's, AA might actually go that route. But SW probably has the -700 line pumping out at full capacity, they are still taking on about 2 or so planes per month, IIRC.

Does it really work that way? I thought 737s were 737s were 737s when it came to assembly (variant doesn't matter). Are some variants available sooner than others? If so, then new 737-600s should be available for delivery by next week (or at least by mid-April) if ordered by Friday, given the lack of orders. B)

FWIW, last year, Boeing delivered 302 737s, or about 25 per month. So far this year, about 25 per month. 1999-2001 deliveries were about 300 per year, while 2002-05 deliveries were clustered around 200 per year. Production rates were substantially increased last year, back to the all-time highs.

That said, I doubt that AA would have taken 737-700s even if they had been available starting next month.
 
Thats two years before the first "replacement" tin shows up. What indication is there that those 80s will last that long let alone much longer at all - do they make that much duct tape?

Is there any special additional training required in the cockpit to pilot the 700 or are they all pretty much the same?

Trust me, Douglas made those 80's so they will last until the new 737's start showing up.
 
"Thats two years before the first "replacement" tin shows up. What indication is there that those 80s will last that long let alone much longer at all - do they make that much duct tape?"

Well, considering that TWA accepted some of them after AA was already accepting 738, it's likely they'll not need duct tape or beely tape as I've heard before...
 
So we should be getting the 737 in STL about the time I will be retiring (2012). Figures!

Do you need some Scope, to rinse out that bitter taste in your mouth? :rolleyes:

Here is the entire story...

737s Flying Into Fleet Renewal Plan

American has taken an important first step toward renewing its fleet - while continuing to improve fuel fleet efficiency and lower operating costs -- by accelerating the delivery of Boeing 737-800 aircraft to replace some of its MD-80s.

AA has notified Boeing that it intends to begin pulling forward the delivery of 47 737s, originally scheduled to arrive in 2013-2016, into the 2009-2012 timeframe. The first three aircraft are expected to arrive in early 2009, with the timing of the remaining aircraft deliveries dependent upon a variety of factors, such as American's financial condition and the health of the economy and the airline sector.

"We believe that beginning to replace some of our MD-80s in a measured way makes economic sense and represents prudent and strategic reinvestment in our business that will bring long-term benefits to shareholders, customers and employees," said AMR Chairman and CEO Gerard Arpey. "Our existing agreement with Boeing gives us ample flexibility for our long-term fleet plan. While the MD-80 remains an excellent aircraft that serves us and our customers well, the new 737s will be a great addition to our fleet that will lower our operating costs, boost the fuel efficiency of our fleet and also bolster our efforts to lower emissions and noise levels."

Arpey cited the news as the latest example of AA's efforts to reduce operating costs and fuel consumption. American estimates that the 737 consumes 25 percent less fuel than an older MD-80. Arpey also said that the announcement today is a step toward the AA's goal of improving fleet fuel efficiency by more than 20 percent by 2020.

As part of AA's Fuel Smart program that has reduced consumption of jet fuel by about 95 million gallons annually, American continues to add winglets to its 737 and 757 fleets and is also saving fuel by employing high-speed tractors to tow airplanes on the ground and by taxiing aircraft with a single engine when feasible. American has set a goal in 2007 to increase Fuel Smart annualized consumption savings to 125 million gallons.

American's long-term purchase contract with Boeing gives AA substantial fleet flexibility and includes the right to purchase on short notice additional 737s well beyond the 47 committed aircraft as well as the right to purchase 787 aircraft.

The purchase contract with Boeing gives American the ability to obtain the 47 aircraft and additional 737 aircraft with a delivery schedule that best meets the needs of the business, without having to make large firm delivery commitments at a specific time, and American's "purchase rights" give it the ability to acquire such additional aircraft from Boeing with as little as 15 months notice.

Arpey noted that today's announcement represents a significant investment in the business and a necessary first step in what can be a long and capital intensive process. "It can take many years to replace 300 aircraft, which is why we need to move forward with fleet renewal today even as we continue to work to improve our financial and operational performance and strengthen our balance sheet," Arpey said. "Our announcement today shows that we are taking action to strike the right balance between reinvestment in the business and the need for financial improvement. As we continue to improve our financial performance we will have more flexibility to reinvest in the business for the future."
 
"American's long-term purchase contract with Boeing gives AA substantial fleet flexibility and includes the right to purchase on short notice additional 737s well beyond the 47 committed aircraft as well as the right to purchase 787 aircraft."

I would assume that would be the carrot they will dangle in front of APA...
 
Is that because of FA contracts or the seating arrangements?

I thought most 738s had >150 seats while 73Gs usually have <150.
And, there's your answer. An a/c with 150 seats requires 3 flight attendants minimum. An a/c with 151 seats requires 4 flight attendants minimum. You would have to cram seats in a la ATA (their 738 seats 191, IIRC)to pay for that 4th f/a.
 
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