AMFA @ Alaska completes wage review and bumps pay scale % up 11.5% each step

SWAMECH

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Apr 26, 2005
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Congrats to our peers at ALK and AMFA for getting a big increase in the pay scale steps for their members.


And here's the entire update from AMFA with the Oct 2022 updates:

National President Update - September 2022
October 7, 2022 -- We are happy to announce another new addition to AMFA. This is another tangible result exemplifying AMFA’s impact on labor in the aviation industry in North America and that the craft/trade-specific AMFA representation movement is accelerating. Earlier this year, the Canadian Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) certified as a trade union in Canada, and earlier this week the L3 Technologies MAS at CFB Trenton aviation professionals, with nearly 100% participation, selected AMFA as their union representative.
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CorvetteMan

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Jul 7, 2022
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Up to now Alaska has contracted with vendors for about 60 percent of its heavy maintenance, while the other 40 percent has been done by its staff at its Oakland hangar. Effective today, the Oakland facility will be closed and the work transferred to two vendors.
Alaska employs 340 people at the base -- some 80 percent of them licensed aircraft technicians. The remainder serve in various administrative and support functions. Depending on seniority, bargaining unit employees will be laid off or given the opportunity to bid into other maintenance locations in the Alaska system.
The move is part of a wide-ranging series of streamlining initiatives the airline is announcing today, and comes on the heels of a management reorganization that started last month. All told, Alaska is trimming nearly 900 of its more than 11,000 employees and either contracting out work or, with regard to management, reorganizing to achieve the same results with fewer people. The collective savings is projected at between $30 million and $35 million per year.”
 

WeAAsles

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Oct 20, 2007
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Up to now Alaska has contracted with vendors for about 60 percent of its heavy maintenance, while the other 40 percent has been done by its staff at its Oakland hangar. Effective today, the Oakland facility will be closed and the work transferred to two vendors.
Alaska employs 340 people at the base -- some 80 percent of them licensed aircraft technicians. The remainder serve in various administrative and support functions. Depending on seniority, bargaining unit employees will be laid off or given the opportunity to bid into other maintenance locations in the Alaska system.
The move is part of a wide-ranging series of streamlining initiatives the airline is announcing today, and comes on the heels of a management reorganization that started last month. All told, Alaska is trimming nearly 900 of its more than 11,000 employees and either contracting out work or, with regard to management, reorganizing to achieve the same results with fewer people. The collective savings is projected at between $30 million and $35 million per year.”

I always love how the AMFA acolytes want to talk about all the past losses at other Airlines they don’t represent but will never admit that their History is also stained with a lot of loss.

AMFA was certified at Alaska Airlines (ASA) on March 30, 1998.
 
OP
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SWAMECH

Senior
Apr 26, 2005
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And here are the final results of Alaska's wage review.
Congrats for getting in 2nd place.


 

WeAAsles

Veteran
Oct 20, 2007
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And here are the final results of Alaska's wage review.
Congrats for getting in 2nd place.



When other Airlines have their yearly wage increase dates will you congratulate them as well since you like running all over Forums congratulating everyone all the time?

AA will only be one ☝️ penny below Alaska until the end of March.
 

CorvetteMan

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Jul 7, 2022
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And here are the final results of Alaska's wage review.
Congrats for getting in 2nd place.


 

WeAAsles

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Oct 20, 2007
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As of May 3, 2022 they only have 840 Members servicing 329 Aircraft. That’s a very small ratio again of Mechanics per Aircraft. 2.56 if my Math is correct. Airline Data Project wrote that they had 5.5 in 2020. 🧐


 

eolesen

Veteran
Jul 23, 2003
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It's great to try and cherry pick statistics to beat up AMFA, but 30 years ago there was no Outsourcing whatsoever for IAM or TWU represented airlines.

Today every one major outsources overhaul, so who is to blame for that?

Personal opinion only, but it won't surprise me to see WN, AA and UA spin it out entirely in the next 30 years. DL turned it into a profit center but even that's questionable anymore.

There's a looming mechanic shortage coming and closing down overhaul with a guaranteed job protection for AMTs on the line isn't out of the question.

Also consider that California is a horrible place to do business, especially where environmental laws are concerned, and things like parts washing and painting are chemical heavy. Compliance gets expensive quickly.

But hey, blame AMFA for all that.
 

WeAAsles

Veteran
Oct 20, 2007
22,338
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It's great to try and cherry pick statistics to beat up AMFA, but 30 years ago there was no Outsourcing whatsoever for IAM or TWU represented airlines.

Today every one major outsources overhaul, so who is to blame for that?

Personal opinion only, but it won't surprise me to see WN, AA and UA spin it out entirely in the next 30 years. DL turned it into a profit center but even that's questionable anymore.

There's a looming mechanic shortage coming and closing down overhaul with a guaranteed job protection for AMTs on the line isn't out of the question.

Also consider that California is a horrible place to do business, especially where environmental laws are concerned, and things like parts washing and painting are chemical heavy. Compliance gets expensive quickly.

But hey, blame AMFA for all that.

“I” don’t blame AMFA (Seham) necessarily for the Contract they have at SWA. What I do blame them for though is acting like they’re so great when they haven’t added any work in the 20 years they’ve been representing mechanics at SWA. People who live in glass houses.

You make it sound so easy that these Airlines can just get rid of (Unionized) work. As long as the RLA exists it’s not as easy as you think and with the 1113 code in Bankruptcy even that arena has restrictions. I know you’re a smart guy so have you read the TWU/IAM Scope language yet. They weren’t exactly very accommodating to the Company’s overtures to outsource their work.

30 years from now we’ll both very likely be dead so neither of us can make a call on that.

Airlines are now ramping up partnerships for teaching new AMT’s for the future. Even the Airline you work for just the other day announced one. That will absolutely solve any shortages because nothing personal it doesn’t take that long to get an A&P License. It’s not as serious as the Pilot shortage.
 

CorvetteMan

Advanced
Jul 7, 2022
120
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It's great to try and cherry pick statistics to beat up AMFA, but 30 years ago there was no Outsourcing whatsoever for IAM or TWU represented airlines.

Today every one major outsources overhaul, so who is to blame for that?

Personal opinion only, but it won't surprise me to see WN, AA and UA spin it out entirely in the next 30 years. DL turned it into a profit center but even that's questionable anymore.

There's a looming mechanic shortage coming and closing down overhaul with a guaranteed job protection for AMTs on the line isn't out of the question.

Also consider that California is a horrible place to do business, especially where environmental laws are concerned, and things like parts washing and painting are chemical heavy. Compliance gets expensive quickly.

But hey, blame AMFA for all that.
Delta made $300 million last year from their MRO business.

AS’ heavy maintenance was in SEA. And WN has never had heavy maintenance in CA. And SFO is still open for your employer.
 

WeAAsles

Veteran
Oct 20, 2007
22,338
5,311
It's great to try and cherry pick statistics to beat up AMFA, but 30 years ago there was no Outsourcing whatsoever for IAM or TWU represented airlines.

Today every one major outsources overhaul, so who is to blame for that?

Personal opinion only, but it won't surprise me to see WN, AA and UA spin it out entirely in the next 30 years. DL turned it into a profit center but even that's questionable anymore.

There's a looming mechanic shortage coming and closing down overhaul with a guaranteed job protection for AMTs on the line isn't out of the question.

Also consider that California is a horrible place to do business, especially where environmental laws are concerned, and things like parts washing and painting are chemical heavy. Compliance gets expensive quickly.

But hey, blame AMFA for all that.

Both United and American are starting these apprenticeships and partnership programs for AMT’s. I’m sure Delta has or will have one as well.

 

eolesen

Veteran
Jul 23, 2003
15,813
9,373
You can make assumptions about who I work for and what they're doing, but it really has no bearing nor is part of the discussion.

What I'm talking about is an ongoing industry shift. In the past 20 years, MCI, DLH, AFW, MSP, MEM, OAK, IND and for all intents & purposes PIT now have all disappeared from the overhaul map. And that's just the airlines still in business including mergers.

Bang the scope drum all you want, but the Big Four + AS are among the last airlines doing overhaul in-house. Apprentice programs are great but only go so far towards a much bigger issue than having competent staffing.

If $100 oil persists, it's likely some of those decisions about whether to chose pay/benefits over scope/membership size will need to be revisited, and it's my opinion it's going to be harder and harder for unions and management to continue to justify insourcing at any cost.
 

WeAAsles

Veteran
Oct 20, 2007
22,338
5,311
You can make assumptions about who I work for and what they're doing, but it really has no bearing nor is part of the discussion.

What I'm talking about is an ongoing industry shift. In the past 20 years, MCI, DLH, AFW, MSP, MEM, OAK, IND and for all intents & purposes PIT now have all disappeared from the overhaul map. And that's just the airlines still in business including mergers.

Bang the scope drum all you want, but the Big Four + AS are among the last airlines doing overhaul in-house. Apprentice programs are great but only go so far towards a much bigger issue than having competent staffing.

If $100 oil persists, it's likely some of those decisions about whether to chose pay/benefits over scope/membership size will need to be revisited, and it's my opinion it's going to be harder and harder for unions and management to continue to justify insourcing at any cost.

Justify? No no no it does not work that way. If the Airlines could just do whatever they wanted whenever they wanted I would have been long gone or making $12 per hour which I absolutely am not. AA wanted to dump a lot of work in our JCBA negotiations and that didn’t happen. They absolutely gave the argument that “they need to compete” when it comes to Facilities Maintenance which almost no other Airline has BUT they didn’t get it did they.

They wanted to outsource more OH BUT they didn’t get it.

They made the argument that Delta is non union and UAL has unlimited (Bankruptcy) PT language for Fleet to try to gain the same at AA BUT they didn’t get it.

They wanted to outsource Deicing BUT they didn’t get it.

TWU/IAM held the line. You still haven’t read the contracts.

If you want to live in a Country where it’s a race to the bottom then maybe YOU should lower your expectations for yourself? Maybe the work you do can be outsourced? Wasn’t the US bringing in lots of cheap labor from India to do White Collar work? I can’t see the Company justifying having all these levels and people that maybe aren’t that useful to the bottom line?

WTI is at $86 right now BTW, not $100.

And look even Foxconn in China is having a hard time enticing people to come back to the Factory to put together the Apple I Phones. They can’t even get them for $4.20 per hour and a $69 Bonus. I bet it’s pesky Unions in China too causing problems. 8D7E8A16-2475-4099-B1FC-F7630E20C2FC.jpeg
 

WeAAsles

Veteran
Oct 20, 2007
22,338
5,311
You can make assumptions about who I work for and what they're doing, but it really has no bearing nor is part of the discussion.

What I'm talking about is an ongoing industry shift. In the past 20 years, MCI, DLH, AFW, MSP, MEM, OAK, IND and for all intents & purposes PIT now have all disappeared from the overhaul map. And that's just the airlines still in business including mergers.

Bang the scope drum all you want, but the Big Four + AS are among the last airlines doing overhaul in-house. Apprentice programs are great but only go so far towards a much bigger issue than having competent staffing.

If $100 oil persists, it's likely some of those decisions about whether to chose pay/benefits over scope/membership size will need to be revisited, and it's my opinion it's going to be harder and harder for unions and management to continue to justify insourcing at any cost.

21 years ago was the September 11 terrorist attacks that brought down the World Trade Center and caused massive Worldwide economic destruction.

That’s where your Industry shift came from lest you forgot.

And that was beginning to be reversed with the Industry mergers and dramatic returns in wages and benefits to Union contracts. Prior to the Global Pandemic.

 

CorvetteMan

Advanced
Jul 7, 2022
120
11
You can make assumptions about who I work for and what they're doing, but it really has no bearing nor is part of the discussion.

What I'm talking about is an ongoing industry shift. In the past 20 years, MCI, DLH, AFW, MSP, MEM, OAK, IND and for all intents & purposes PIT now have all disappeared from the overhaul map. And that's just the airlines still in business including mergers.

Bang the scope drum all you want, but the Big Four + AS are among the last airlines doing overhaul in-house. Apprentice programs are great but only go so far towards a much bigger issue than having competent staffing.

If $100 oil persists, it's likely some of those decisions about whether to chose pay/benefits over scope/membership size will need to be revisited, and it's my opinion it's going to be harder and harder for unions and management to continue to justify insourcing at any cost.
AS doesn’t doesn’t do overhaul in-house. It was outsourced their heavy maintenance in 2004. Where have you been?

PIT is contractually protected. And all those bases you listed were closed during bankruptcies.