CRAF flying

ss278

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Aug 25, 2002
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[BR]Any hint as to where the airplanes will come from? Are they pulling them off the schedule or perhaps some from the desert?
 

FA Mikey

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Aug 19, 2002
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I heard that CRAF flying will be happening next month. AA will maintain a system volunteer list. Flight attendants interested, should read appendix E of the AA/APFA agreement. There is a 90 day lockin.
 

FA Mikey

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Aug 19, 2002
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Maintaining this reserve pool, may hold out to be a good thing and keep us from having to furlough for the time being.

I only heard from 1 person about this. I will see tomorrow if flight service knows more.
 

Wild Onion

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Aug 21, 2002
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[blockquote]
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On 12/28/2002 8:09:14 AM FA Mikey wrote:

Its Eric by far.
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[/blockquote]

Eric's knowledge of all things AA is almost freaky sometimes
 

thedog

Member
Dec 27, 2002
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[STRONG][EM]Nothing like a complete and factual explanation without personal attacks interjected or claims of alias conspiracies.[BR][BR]This is getting very serious now.[BR][BR]Thanks Boomer.[/EM][/STRONG]
 

Boomer

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
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USAF Fact Sheet

Civil Reserve Air Fleet
A unique and significant part of the nation's mobility resources is the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF). Selected aircraft from U.S. airlines, contractually committed to CRAF, support Department of Defense airlift requirements in emergencies when the need for airlift exceeds the capability of military aircraft.

The CRAF has three main segments: international, national and aeromedical evacuation. The international segment is further divided into the long-range and short-range sections and the national segment into the domestic and Alaskan sections. Assignment of aircraft to a segment depends on the nature of the requirement and the performance characteristics needed.

The long-range international section consists of passenger and cargo aircraft capable of transoceanic operations. The role of these aircraft is to augment the Air Mobility Command's (AMC) long-range intertheater C-141s, C-5s and C-17s during periods of increased airlift needs, from minor contingencies up through full national defense emergencies.

Medium-sized passenger and cargo aircraft make up the short-range international section supporting near offshore airlift requirements.

The aircraft in the Alaskan section provide airlift within U.S. Pacific Command's area of responsibility. The domestic section is designed to satisfy increased DOD airlift requirements in the U.S. during an emergency.

The aeromedical evacuation segment assists in the evacuation of casualties from operational theaters to hospitals in the continental United States. These aircraft are also used to return medical supplies and medical crews to the theater of operations. Kits containing litter stanchions, litters and other aeromedical equipment are used to convert civil B-767 passenger aircraft into air ambulances.

The airlines contractually pledge aircraft to the various CRAF segments, ready for activation when needed. To provide incentives for civil carriers to commit these aircraft to the CRAF program and to assure the United States of adequate airlift reserves, AMC awards peacetime airlift contracts to civilian airlines which offer aircraft to the CRAF. The International Airlift Services contract is the largest of these. For fiscal year 1999, the guaranteed portion of the contract is $345 million. AMC estimates that throughout fiscal year 1999 it will also award more than $362 million in additional business that is not guaranteed.

To join CRAF, carriers must maintain minimum long-range international fleet commitment levels (30 percent for passenger and 15 percent for cargo). Aircraft committed must be U.S.-registered aircraft capable of overwater operations, at least 3,500 nautical mile range and 10 hours per day utilization rate. Carriers must also commit and maintain at least four complete crews for each aircraft.

Short-range international section aircraft must be capable of overwater operations and at least a 1,500 nautical mile range. National segment aircraft must be capable of carrying 75 passengers or 32,000 pounds (14,515 kilograms) of cargo. Carriers with aircraft too small to be eligible for the CRAF program are issued a certificate of technical ineligibility so they can compete for government airlift business.

As of Oct. 1, 1998, 35 carriers and 657 aircraft were enrolled in the CRAF. This includes 573 aircraft in the international segment (494 in the long-range international section and 79 in the short-range international section), and 56 and 28 aircraft, respectively, in the national and aeromedical evacuation segments. These numbers are subject to change monthly.

Three stages of incremental activation allow for tailoring an airlift force suitable for the contingency at hand. Stage I is for minor regional crises, Stage II would be used for major regional contingencies and Stage III for periods of national mobilization.

The commander in chief, U.S. Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), with approval of the secretary of defense, is the activation authority for all three stages of CRAF. During a crisis, if AMC has a need for additional aircraft, it would request USTRANSCOM to take steps to activate the appropriate CRAF stage.

Each stage of the CRAF activation is only used to the extent necessary to provide the amount of civil augmentation airlift needed by DOD. When notified of call-up, the carrier response time to have its aircraft ready for a CRAF mission is 24 to 48 hours after the mission is assigned by AMC. The air carriers continue to operate and maintain the aircraft with their resources; however, AMC controls the aircraft missions.

Safety is the paramount concern, and numerous procedures are in effect to ensure that the air carriers with which AMC contracts afford the highest level of safety to DOD passengers. Prior to receiving a contract, DOD carriers must demonstrate that they have provided substantially equivalent and comparable commercial service for one year prior to flying for DOD. All carriers must be fully certified Federal Aviation Administration carriers and meet the stringent standards of federal aviation regulations pertaining to commercial airlines (FARS Part 121).

A DOD survey team, composed of experienced AMC pilots and skilled maintenance personnel, performs an on-site inspection of the carriers. This team conducts a comprehensive inspection that includes carrier's aircraft, training facilities, crew qualifications, maintenance procedures and quality control practices to maximize the likelihood that the carrier would safely perform for DOD. After passing this survey, the carrier is certified as DOD-approved.

AMC analysts then continue to monitor the carrier's safety record, operations and maintenance status, contract performance, financial condition and management initiatives, summarizing significant trends in a comprehensive review every six months. In addition to this in-depth review, there are several other surveillance initiatives. These include safety preflight inspections of commercial aircraft by DOD designated inspectors, periodic cockpit observations on operational flights by highly experienced pilots from AMC's Air Carrier Survey and Analysis Division, and an increase in the frequency of on-site surveys. These initiatives and the surveys are further supplemented by an open flow of information on all contract carriers between AMC and the FAA through established liaison officers.

Air Mobility Command, Public Affairs Office; 503 Ward Street, Suite 214; Scott AFB, IL 62226-5335; DSN 576-5003 or (618) 256-5003.
 
[blockquote]
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On 12/28/2002 11:09:18 AM Wild Onion wrote:

Eric's knowledge of all things AA is almost freaky sometimes
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[/blockquote]

Yeah, well... 10+ years in HDQ will do that to you....

We've built both 763 and 777 equipment and time into the schedule to support CRAF and military charter flying for the past three months.

CRAF probably won't be activated until AMC decides that they need more capacity than they've been able to get on the free market. And there's a lot of widebody capacity available on the free market right now...


I have a very special attachment for CRAF flying -- I met our first CRAF mission for Desert Shield when I was still an agent in ORD. Nothing quite like opening the door to a DC10-30 and being met by MP's with loaded M-16s... It was a group of aircraft techicians out of George AFB near Victorville, CA, on their way to Dharain, Saudi Arabia. Fortunately, they all made it back OK.
 

Rhino

Senior
Aug 20, 2002
308
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My one and only Craf was on an AA 747 HNL-Andy AFB, Guam. May '75. Locked and loaded with some serious companions.

Transloaded to C-130s. We were gonna thermite all mil acft at DaNang and Ton Son Nhut. Changed our mind, turned around, and landed again at Andy.

Spent a great weekend at the Intercontintal with a good-looking AA FA redhead, though. Then ran a VN refugee camp for three months, less fun. She lived in Port Jeff. Wondered how she's doing. 27+ years ago. Hope she's not furloughed.
 

Busdrvr

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
2,217
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[blockquote]
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On 12/30/2002 12:12:20 AM eolesen wrote:

Comment on UAL being able to grab more than anyone else...

No, they won't.

CRAF is done on a point system, in order to spread the work fairly amongst the participating carriers. So, as long as there are carriers who have aircraft available, UAL won't get more flying simply because they have a bunch of widebodies parked in the desert...

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[/blockquote]

Does the point system include the number of jets you've pledged to CRAF? Does an AMR, who's parked all the -10's and likely doesn't have trained crews, cancel scheduled service to send jets to the CRAF when someone else is ready (trained crews), willing and able? Does the government go straight to the CRAF or do they attempt to contract out extra lift first?
 

FA Mikey

Veteran
Aug 19, 2002
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301
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goldwatermiller08.com
AA has the 767 and the 777 dedicated to the program now. During the run up to the last war we had to cancel some flights due to shortage of A/C and crews.

What ever the goverment does, I am sure the airlines will make money on it. They will all be lined up for their fair share.
 

ual06

Senior
Aug 30, 2002
331
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Don't know how AA did it in the Gulf War; but, during the buildup, UAL used line crews (all volunteers) to certain enroute stops and only Management Pilots on the last legs. One Management Pilot got into very hot water when he told a news crew where he had been. UAL did use mostly all line crews (again all volunteers) to bring the troops home. That was some of the most rewarding and enjoyable flying I every did. (Ferry to Europe, three round trips to the Middle East, return to States, ten days). If you get a chance to fly CRAF - jump at it. One caution - expect long days. Basic FAR's and duty regs go out the window. We based out of a city in Europe. Only one other CRAF carrier based there. It was a 7 hour ferry to the Middle East, 3 hours on the ground, 7 hours back. But then the crew went to the hotel. The troops onboard could not get off. They got a new crew and continued across the Atlantic. It was a tradition to open the overhead emergency escape hatch on the B-747 and have a Soldier "fly" the flag on the state-side taxi in. One Fed got upset. Said, an emergency exit could not be opened except in an emergency plus unauthorized personnel in cockpit. The word went out. Do not fly the flag on taxi in. We came back in on a Sunday morning. Fed will not be out today. We had a Soldier fly the flag. There was a Fed. He came into the cockpit, said I need to see your "tickets", blab, blab.. He started to leave, turned around, and with a great big smile said, "By the way, "I" did not see a flag flying on taxi in". After the troops deplaned across the Red Carpet, through the "receiving" line; the F/A's and us tried to sneak away. The Base Commander caught us and insisted we all walk the line. All on that line, cheered the crew as they had cheered their returning loved ones.
 

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