Something To Look Into

wench1

Veteran
Sep 17, 2006
649
27
Company has a better solution ...... it's call a self-service kiosks! No health care at all, just insert a new roll of paper once every day or two .... :up:


Im sure the kiosk can reroute and change paper also.

or,,res can do it all...we dont need a ticket counter or TSA at our counter doing bags.
What about the bags?
Let the passengers check THEIR own bags.
 

john john

Veteran
Contributor
Sep 12, 2004
5,742
636
A strike vote?? When was that? Show me in writing or a link that a "strike vote was ever given out!"
For the new hires and the ones with short memory on passenger service labor issue
You ask for it you got it


US Airways executives' new business plan looks like a disaster plan...
Eight months after coming out of bankruptcy, US Airways executives are trying to sell parts of the airline to stay afloat, according to the New York Times. The Times article says executives have retained the firm of Morgan Stanley to help evaluate and sell pieces of the airline - the US Airways Shuttle, US Airways Express, certain LGA and BOS gates, and one of the three hubs.
The article also refers to the widespread speculation within the airline industry that US Airways is heading back into bankruptcy.
It is clear that the current US Airways executives have failed to come up with a successful post-bankruptcy business plan so, logically, something new has to be tried. But it's hard to see how the airline can thrive if their "new" business plan involves selling choice pieces of the airline and further downsizing. We can expect more jobs will be lost if this happens. That sounds like a recipe for disaster rather than success.
HERE ARE SOME THOUGHTS WE HAVE ABOUT THIS LATEST DEVELOPMENT:
•Selling-off major parts of US Airways will likely be the beginning of the end for the airline; has the asset sale been thoroughly reviewed and OK'ed by the Board of Directors?
•Has the Board of Directors commissioned a second opinion by competent airline analysts before OK'ing this move?
•Was the recent plan to work-out a revised business plan with union and employee participation just a smokescreen for the real plan - selling-off US Airways piece by piece?
•And, finally, it's possible the plan to sell-off parts of US Airways is, itself, a plan to put pressure on employees to make more concessions. Time will tell what the executives, and the Board of Directors, are up to.
Maybe employees should subscribe to the New York Times; the paper has more up-to-date information on US Airways than the executives' weekly telephone message.
Full text of the NYT story>
To BK or not to BK, that is the question…
"We will restructure the airline with or without the employees." That now-famous remark by Dr. Bronner has been interpreted to mean that management has a plan to declare bankruptcy (BK in finance shorthand) for a second time. That would mean they could change the employment contracts without a vote of the employees.
Feeding the speculation are various website postings claiming that a US Airways official has described a "pre-packaged bankruptcy where the equity is preserved or re-issued and the company rejects lease agreements and labor contracts."
Ethical problem: If US Airways attempts another bankruptcy in order to reject employment contracts, it will put the ethical values of the corporation on the line.
That's because CWA and other unions have signed agreements that US Airways would not attempt to reopen the contracts again in Bankruptcy Court once the employees ratified the previous 2002-2003 concessions contracts.
Goldman Sachs sheds light on recent statements by US Airways executives... When Goldman Sachs says, "We suspect that [US Airways] proposed asset sales were primarily a threat to get labor back to the table," it is clear that some in the business world take the statements of our execs with a grain of salt.

US Airways filed for bankruptcy protection on Sept. 12 2004
CWA’ers met with management on 6/22 to hear the details of their Transformation plan...CWA presented alternatives...
6-23-2004
US Airways CEO and VP Labor Relations meet with CWA president Morty Bahr...
CEO Bruce Lakefield and VP Jerry Glass met with CWA President Morty Bahr at CWA's DC Headquarters on Tuesday, July 13.
The US Airways executives asked for the meeting to present their view that US Airways needs employee concessions to avoid bankruptcy. They laid-out more specifics of their proposals for CWA Passenger Service pay and benefit cuts.
In general, their proposal is to offer a buyout package (somewhat less than the CWA's proposal), and those who refuse the buyout and remain on the job would be reduced to the America West level in pay, vacation, sick benefits, and retirement.
Retiree medical would be eliminated.
Those recalled from furlough would come back at the starting rate.
Those on the job would keep their seniority, but be reduced to the America West pay scale (top rate of $13.10 per hour).

The executives also implied they are considering moving the res centers to "lower cost areas".
All this is how management proposes to cut $122 million from the payroll and benefits of passenger service.
Our CWA research department continues to work with us on counter-proposals that will save the company money (very large amounts of money) but do not cut the employees' standard of living as the management's plan would.
There are no meetings with management scheduled at this point, but we will be setting up meetings in the near future.
CWA local presidents and staff will meet Friday with our bankruptcy attorney Dan Katz of the law firm Katz & Rantzman, and CWA research economists to review bankruptcy procedures and to develop data on our proposals.
We'll keep you informed of developments as they unfold.
STORY>
http://web.archive.org/web/20040726000612/...://www.cwa.net/

CWA'ers and management will meet to discuss cost-cutting proposals…
7/16/2004
CWA local presidents, staff and analysts will meet with US Airways management beginning Tuesday, July 27, at US Airways Headquarters, to review and discuss management's most recent proposals (buyout and America West pay and benefits) and the CWA proposals (buyout and res work at home).
We will be discussing our ideas for ways in which our contract might be amended to provide substantial cost savings through the buyout and WAH plan, but without the drastic cuts in living standard that management has been proposing so far.
We expect this will lead to several days of discussions in July.
Any proposed changes must be voted on and ratified by CWA members. We'll keep you posted after each meeting.
CWA Local Officers and Staff





http://web.archive.org/web/20041206003739/http://cwa.net/
Creditors' Committee Appointed for US Airways
By Keith L. Alexander
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, September 21, 2004
US Airways' four major unions and nine of its largest creditors were appointed yesterday to a creditors' committee, which will play a critical role in the carrier's reorganization.
Nearly 200 lawyers, creditors and financial advisers crowded into the ballroom of the Key Bridge Marriott hotel in Rosslyn yesterday, seeking a spot on the committee that will help steer management decisions during the airline's bankruptcy.
U.S. Trustee W. Clarkson McDow Jr. appointed the Air Line Pilots Association, the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, the Communication Workers of America, and the Association of Flight Attendants. Several aircraft and engine manufacturers, including Airbus North America Holdings Inc., General Electric Co. and Bombardier Inc., also were appointed.
The committee will include the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp., the federal agency that took over the airline's pilots pension plan during its first bankruptcy nearly two years ago. Also on the committee is Electronic Data Systems Corp., Sabre Holdings Corp., U.S. Bank, Wachovia Corp. and the airline's food supplier LSG Skychefs.
http://web.archive.org/web/20041206003739/http://cwa.net/

Management turns down CWA's six-month, $33 million cost reduction offer and demands much, much more…
10-7-04

Strike authorization vote by US Airways Passenger Service employees passes overwhelmingly: 86% approve, 14% disapprove...
11-10-2004
CWA represented US Airways agents and reps have voted overwhelmingly to authorize a strike or other lawful job action in the event that management imposes concessions through the bankruptcy process without a vote of the employees. With strong showings from all locations and workgroups, the CWA Passenger Service local presidents counted the ballots today at CWA’s national headquarters in Washington, DC.
The final vote tally was 86% in favor of strike authorization and 14% opposed. Full details and explanation of the strike vote authorization process and procedures, including CWA strike benefits, is contained in the letter you received at your home address accompanying your strike authorization ballot.
The CWA local presidents immediately issued this statement: “Thank you, agents and reps, for giving us this show of strength and determination. We pledge to make every effort to reach a reasonable settlement with management – a settlement that can be ratified by a vote of the employees. Thank you for support

Management files to reject the contracts of passenger service, flight attendants, mechanics and ramp, and also files to terminate all pension plans...
11-13-04
Management could not explain how our frozen plan (which they now claim is $270 million underfunded) could have deteriorated when it was fully funded at the time it was frozen.
CWA will meet with actuaries for the plan to try to get to the bottom of that question.
Bankruptcy hearing will be on December 2... Negotiations momentum has been lost because of management contracting-out demands...
11-18-04
Management ‘s last proposal still has several extreme demands:

CWA Board Clears the Way for Possible Strike By US Airways Passenger Service Agents
11/30/2004
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Communications Workers of America's national executive board voted unanimously to authorize strike action by 6,000 passenger service agents against US Airways, clearing the way for CWA's president to set a strike date.
The passenger agents earlier this month voted by 86 percent to authorize a strike against the airline in a membership referendum.
Meanwhile, CWA negotiators are continuing to meet this week with US Airways management in an attempt to reach a new labor settlement.
The airline has demanded devastating pay and benefit concessions from the agents and has petitioned the bankruptcy judge to throw out their union contract.
Abrogation of the contract would allow the agents to strike or engage in other job actions.
For More Information contact:
Jeff Miller,
CWA Communications,
(202) 434-1168


CWA reaches tentative agreement with US Airways management... now members will vote on the contract...
12/02/2004
http://web.archive.org/web/20040401183327/...LOFFNYTjump.asp

Mgmt attempts
to suppress
CWA report on
Labor Advisory
meeting... We
believe members are entitled
to know the substance and
content of our meetings with
management, and also the
direction and implication of
policies and programs that
are under discussion. The
only exception we make is
that we don’t publicly report
legitimate, unreleased,
“business confi dential†data,
charts, or strategies that would
aid or assist a competitor of
US Airways.
Management does not like
this CWA policy. From day one
they have complained about
our reports to our members
and have tried to prevent or
censor the distribution of
legitimate information. In the
past, management has even
threatened to sue us (i.e. last
December when we reported
the CEO’s threat to shut down
the airline before Christmas if
the unions didn’t accept the
second round of negotiations),
and now they are on another
tirade about our membership
Update Report on the May 22
Labor Advisory Committee
meeting.

http://web.archive.org/web/20040213021149/...+Newsletter.pdf
 

john john

Veteran
Contributor
Sep 12, 2004
5,742
636
Yes, not many jobs that require no education pay $19 an hour. And 19 an hour for part time is even more unheard of. It's a sweet deal. People complain and hate the company and resent the job but the will not leave because they know they qualify for a $10. 00 an hour job.
TSA for one
and better benefits
 

john john

Veteran
Contributor
Sep 12, 2004
5,742
636
This is just ONE expample of what is happening in my station. Due to the contract allowing 26 swap offs per quarter, a part-timer who is scheduled for 20 hrs. a week can swap off 2 days a week. Now this employee only works 3 days a week, 4 hrs. a day.
The company would love to reduce the amount of swap. More swaps and flexibility always is one of the most important issues for the agents
 

usa1

Veteran
Oct 6, 2008
1,205
308
Im sure the kiosk can reroute and change paper also.

or,,res can do it all...we dont need a ticket counter or TSA at our counter doing bags.
What about the bags?
Let the passengers check THEIR own bags.

New reroute desk and reroute kiosk's are on the way ..... discussed in another thread....
 

wench1

Veteran
Sep 17, 2006
649
27
part timers drag on the company, come in make mess and FT have to clean up
Oh really?
What about an 7 yr F/T employee that DOES NOT TAKE a cash bag when working the t/c and tells the supervisor I dont do a cash bag?
And she is still with the company...

Alcohol smells and the supervisors smell it and DO NOTHING!

Dont Preach to the choir.

I could go on and on but why?
 

ontimetada

Member
Oct 9, 2009
18
0
For the new hires and the ones with short memory on passenger service labor issue
You ask for it you got it


US Airways executives' new business plan looks like a disaster plan...
Eight months after coming out of bankruptcy, US Airways executives are trying to sell parts of the airline to stay afloat, according to the New York Times. The Times article says executives have retained the firm of Morgan Stanley to help evaluate and sell pieces of the airline - the US Airways Shuttle, US Airways Express, certain LGA and BOS gates, and one of the three hubs.
The article also refers to the widespread speculation within the airline industry that US Airways is heading back into bankruptcy.
It is clear that the current US Airways executives have failed to come up with a successful post-bankruptcy business plan so, logically, something new has to be tried. But it's hard to see how the airline can thrive if their "new" business plan involves selling choice pieces of the airline and further downsizing. We can expect more jobs will be lost if this happens. That sounds like a recipe for disaster rather than success.
HERE ARE SOME THOUGHTS WE HAVE ABOUT THIS LATEST DEVELOPMENT:
•Selling-off major parts of US Airways will likely be the beginning of the end for the airline; has the asset sale been thoroughly reviewed and OK'ed by the Board of Directors?
•Has the Board of Directors commissioned a second opinion by competent airline analysts before OK'ing this move?
•Was the recent plan to work-out a revised business plan with union and employee participation just a smokescreen for the real plan - selling-off US Airways piece by piece?
•And, finally, it's possible the plan to sell-off parts of US Airways is, itself, a plan to put pressure on employees to make more concessions. Time will tell what the executives, and the Board of Directors, are up to.
Maybe employees should subscribe to the New York Times; the paper has more up-to-date information on US Airways than the executives' weekly telephone message.
Full text of the NYT story>
To BK or not to BK, that is the question…
"We will restructure the airline with or without the employees." That now-famous remark by Dr. Bronner has been interpreted to mean that management has a plan to declare bankruptcy (BK in finance shorthand) for a second time. That would mean they could change the employment contracts without a vote of the employees.
Feeding the speculation are various website postings claiming that a US Airways official has described a "pre-packaged bankruptcy where the equity is preserved or re-issued and the company rejects lease agreements and labor contracts."
Ethical problem: If US Airways attempts another bankruptcy in order to reject employment contracts, it will put the ethical values of the corporation on the line.
That's because CWA and other unions have signed agreements that US Airways would not attempt to reopen the contracts again in Bankruptcy Court once the employees ratified the previous 2002-2003 concessions contracts.
Goldman Sachs sheds light on recent statements by US Airways executives... When Goldman Sachs says, "We suspect that [US Airways] proposed asset sales were primarily a threat to get labor back to the table," it is clear that some in the business world take the statements of our execs with a grain of salt.

US Airways filed for bankruptcy protection on Sept. 12 2004
CWA’ers met with management on 6/22 to hear the details of their Transformation plan...CWA presented alternatives...
6-23-2004
US Airways CEO and VP Labor Relations meet with CWA president Morty Bahr...
CEO Bruce Lakefield and VP Jerry Glass met with CWA President Morty Bahr at CWA's DC Headquarters on Tuesday, July 13.
The US Airways executives asked for the meeting to present their view that US Airways needs employee concessions to avoid bankruptcy. They laid-out more specifics of their proposals for CWA Passenger Service pay and benefit cuts.
In general, their proposal is to offer a buyout package (somewhat less than the CWA's proposal), and those who refuse the buyout and remain on the job would be reduced to the America West level in pay, vacation, sick benefits, and retirement.
Retiree medical would be eliminated.
Those recalled from furlough would come back at the starting rate.
Those on the job would keep their seniority, but be reduced to the America West pay scale (top rate of $13.10 per hour).

The executives also implied they are considering moving the res centers to "lower cost areas".
All this is how management proposes to cut $122 million from the payroll and benefits of passenger service.
Our CWA research department continues to work with us on counter-proposals that will save the company money (very large amounts of money) but do not cut the employees' standard of living as the management's plan would.
There are no meetings with management scheduled at this point, but we will be setting up meetings in the near future.
CWA local presidents and staff will meet Friday with our bankruptcy attorney Dan Katz of the law firm Katz & Rantzman, and CWA research economists to review bankruptcy procedures and to develop data on our proposals.
We'll keep you informed of developments as they unfold.
STORY>
http://web.archive.org/web/20040726000612/...://www.cwa.net/

CWA'ers and management will meet to discuss cost-cutting proposals…
7/16/2004
CWA local presidents, staff and analysts will meet with US Airways management beginning Tuesday, July 27, at US Airways Headquarters, to review and discuss management's most recent proposals (buyout and America West pay and benefits) and the CWA proposals (buyout and res work at home).
We will be discussing our ideas for ways in which our contract might be amended to provide substantial cost savings through the buyout and WAH plan, but without the drastic cuts in living standard that management has been proposing so far.
We expect this will lead to several days of discussions in July.
Any proposed changes must be voted on and ratified by CWA members. We'll keep you posted after each meeting.
CWA Local Officers and Staff





http://web.archive.org/web/20041206003739/http://cwa.net/
Creditors' Committee Appointed for US Airways
By Keith L. Alexander
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, September 21, 2004
US Airways' four major unions and nine of its largest creditors were appointed yesterday to a creditors' committee, which will play a critical role in the carrier's reorganization.
Nearly 200 lawyers, creditors and financial advisers crowded into the ballroom of the Key Bridge Marriott hotel in Rosslyn yesterday, seeking a spot on the committee that will help steer management decisions during the airline's bankruptcy.
U.S. Trustee W. Clarkson McDow Jr. appointed the Air Line Pilots Association, the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, the Communication Workers of America, and the Association of Flight Attendants. Several aircraft and engine manufacturers, including Airbus North America Holdings Inc., General Electric Co. and Bombardier Inc., also were appointed.
The committee will include the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp., the federal agency that took over the airline's pilots pension plan during its first bankruptcy nearly two years ago. Also on the committee is Electronic Data Systems Corp., Sabre Holdings Corp., U.S. Bank, Wachovia Corp. and the airline's food supplier LSG Skychefs.
http://web.archive.org/web/20041206003739/http://cwa.net/

Management turns down CWA's six-month, $33 million cost reduction offer and demands much, much more…
10-7-04

Strike authorization vote by US Airways Passenger Service employees passes overwhelmingly: 86% approve, 14% disapprove...
11-10-2004
CWA represented US Airways agents and reps have voted overwhelmingly to authorize a strike or other lawful job action in the event that management imposes concessions through the bankruptcy process without a vote of the employees. With strong showings from all locations and workgroups, the CWA Passenger Service local presidents counted the ballots today at CWA’s national headquarters in Washington, DC.
The final vote tally was 86% in favor of strike authorization and 14% opposed. Full details and explanation of the strike vote authorization process and procedures, including CWA strike benefits, is contained in the letter you received at your home address accompanying your strike authorization ballot.
The CWA local presidents immediately issued this statement: “Thank you, agents and reps, for giving us this show of strength and determination. We pledge to make every effort to reach a reasonable settlement with management – a settlement that can be ratified by a vote of the employees. Thank you for support

Management files to reject the contracts of passenger service, flight attendants, mechanics and ramp, and also files to terminate all pension plans...
11-13-04
Management could not explain how our frozen plan (which they now claim is $270 million underfunded) could have deteriorated when it was fully funded at the time it was frozen.
CWA will meet with actuaries for the plan to try to get to the bottom of that question.
Bankruptcy hearing will be on December 2... Negotiations momentum has been lost because of management contracting-out demands...
11-18-04
Management ‘s last proposal still has several extreme demands:

CWA Board Clears the Way for Possible Strike By US Airways Passenger Service Agents
11/30/2004
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Communications Workers of America's national executive board voted unanimously to authorize strike action by 6,000 passenger service agents against US Airways, clearing the way for CWA's president to set a strike date.
The passenger agents earlier this month voted by 86 percent to authorize a strike against the airline in a membership referendum.
Meanwhile, CWA negotiators are continuing to meet this week with US Airways management in an attempt to reach a new labor settlement.
The airline has demanded devastating pay and benefit concessions from the agents and has petitioned the bankruptcy judge to throw out their union contract.
Abrogation of the contract would allow the agents to strike or engage in other job actions.
For More Information contact:
Jeff Miller,
CWA Communications,
(202) 434-1168


CWA reaches tentative agreement with US Airways management... now members will vote on the contract...
12/02/2004
http://web.archive.org/web/20040401183327/...LOFFNYTjump.asp

Mgmt attempts
to suppress
CWA report on
Labor Advisory
meeting... We
believe members are entitled
to know the substance and
content of our meetings with
management, and also the
direction and implication of
policies and programs that
are under discussion. The
only exception we make is
that we don’t publicly report
legitimate, unreleased,
“business confi dential†data,
charts, or strategies that would
aid or assist a competitor of
US Airways.
Management does not like
this CWA policy. From day one
they have complained about
our reports to our members
and have tried to prevent or
censor the distribution of
legitimate information. In the
past, management has even
threatened to sue us (i.e. last
December when we reported
the CEO’s threat to shut down
the airline before Christmas if
the unions didn’t accept the
second round of negotiations),
and now they are on another
tirade about our membership
Update Report on the May 22
Labor Advisory Committee
meeting.

http://web.archive.org/web/20040213021149/...+Newsletter.pdf


john,john-what does this have to do with today these are 2004 postings?
 

john john

Veteran
Contributor
Sep 12, 2004
5,742
636
john,john-what does this have to do with today these are 2004 postings?




I thing a lot of newbie’s need a history lesson on and off the board





"Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it."

QUOTE (LGA / 037 @ Nov 5 2009, 11:01 PM)
A strike vote?? When was that? Show me in writing or a link that a "strike vote was ever given out!"



you need to hookup with your guy in LGA