IBT to AMFA

dash8avionic

Newbie
Sep 17, 2002
3
0
Can anybody tell me why Southwest Airlines'' Mechanics changed from IBT to AMFA? Here at Allegheny Airlines were looking at possibly going from IBT to AMFA. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Dash8avionic
 

Steiner

Advanced
Aug 21, 2002
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www.usaviation.com
Possible better representation?

Also with AMFA, if you don't like it, you can always go back, since AMFA is not AFL-CIO affiliated and the AFL-CIO no-poaching-of-members-between-unions agreement (no union competition) does not apply. Try it, maybe you'll like what you get for your dues dollars.


Also check out how well the card drive to get the IAM back at Alaska and Northwest is going.
 

WNjetdoc

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
532
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www.usaviation.com
[blockquote]
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On 2/14/2003 6:22:16 PM dash8avionic wrote:

Can anybody tell me why Southwest Airlines' Mechanics changed from IBT to AMFA? Here at Allegheny Airlines were looking at possibly going from IBT to AMFA. Any info would be greatly appreciated.


Dash8avionic
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[/blockquote]
Not trying to be a smarty pants, but why are you guys thinking of switching to AMFA? We had the IBT do some underhanded deeds to us. They had some "behind the door" deals with the company. We found at near the end that they had been charging us dues at 2.5 times our base pay, PLUS premium pay as well. They were not authorized to do that. We called down and a office cordinator actually faxed us a copy of the, "behind the door" agreement they had came up with. To them, they said, union dues at 2.5 times base pay meant ALL pay. Base pay and your shift and license pay are all base, according to how they read it...yea right. The finally admitted they were wrong but were not going to give us back pay for the years they had been doing it. "Too bad" they said. Thats just some of the reasons, for us. Good Luck. Oh yea, get this. We have sent in withdraw cards to the IBT. Well, they have been sending them back to us, with a big red X saying, "Denied"....that is the latest crap they have pulled. But to me, they were better than the IAM.
 
OP
D

dash8avionic

Newbie
Sep 17, 2002
3
0
It seems to us here at Allegheny that IBT is giving into everything the company wants in concessions at negotiations. We cant get a straight answer to any of the questions that we ask IBT, there always giving us the run around. We voted down the second offer, so the company is raising our insurance to $700 dollars a month. So far IBT is not doing any thing about it. Were getting the feeling that IBT doesn't care about us.

Thanks for the info.

Dash8avionic
 

airlineorphan

Senior
Aug 20, 2002
380
0
www.usaviation.com
[blockquote]
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On 2/15/2003 6:26:23 PM dash8avionic wrote:

It seems to us here at Allegheny that IBT is giving into everything the company wants in concessions at negotiations. We cant get a straight answer to any of the questions that we ask IBT, there always giving us the run around. We voted down the second offer, so the company is raising our insurance to $700 dollars a month. So far IBT is not doing any thing about it. Were getting the feeling that IBT doesn't care about us.

Thanks for the info.

Dash8avionic
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[/blockquote]

Hmmmm.... Give the company anything they want? Collude with management to play games with membership dues?

That sure sounds like Junior Hoffa's general approach (as well as that of the old guard Joint Councils!)

In addition to getting in touch with AMFA, I encourage you to talk with the folks at Teamsters for a Democratic Union (TDU). You can get ahold of them via their website: www.tdu.org

The TDU folks are good people and they have a lot of experience in helping folks deal with these sorts of shenanigans.

Good luck!
-Airlineorphan
 

RV4

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
1,885
80
www.usaviation.com
Mechanics in the industry will be much better off if we are ALL under one union umbrella.

AMFA is the only choice to obtain that goal!

Why wouldn't a mechanic want to be in a mechanics union?

Try these other reasons also...

Direct Election of International Officers

Re-call of Local and International Officers

Direct voting on Constitutional changes

Observers in contract negotiations

Ratification of side letters of agreement

More details to ponder...

Overview
The Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association is a craft oriented, independent aviation union. It is not an industrial union and represents only airline technicians and related employees in the craft or class in accordance with the National Mediation Board Rules and their dictates. AMFA is committed to elevating the professional standing of technicians and to achieving progressive improvements in the wages, benefits, and working conditions of the skilled craftsmen and women it represents.

AMFA was created in 1962 but did not represent any carrier until 1964 at Ozark Airlines. It later represented Pacific Airlines, Airlift International, Hughes Airwest, and Southern Airways. AMFA organized the non-union mechanics and related at United Express (ACA) and Mesaba Airlines (Northwest Airlink), and now AMFA represents Alaska and Northwest Airlines, America Trans Air, and Horizon technicians and related personnel. In thirty years AMFA has never accepted concessions, give-backs, two-tier pay scales, or "B" rate mechanics. One reason for this is that the local airline representatives, who are well-acquainted with their airline's problems, are at the bargaining table with the national officers. AMFA also believes in having its members attend and observe contract negotiations. Although this is considered by many to be a novel idea, AMFA has been doing this in negotiations for years, and it has helped both sides to understand the problems and issues that must be resolved at the bargaining table.

Goal
To have all airline technicians and related employees under the AMFA "umbrella."

Mission
To raise the standards of and increase recognition of the technician and related class or craft for the protection of the profession. To afford protection for AMFA members before government agencies and expand the education of members' rights and privileges before Congress whenever it pertains to the craft.

Contract Negotiations
AMFA hires professionals at the bargaining table to present and utilize their particular expertise. For example, in economic areas AMFA hires a financial expert; in the pension and welfare areas we hire a pension actuary. The contract language is reviewed by AMFA's legal counsel before presenting it to the company. During the course of negotiations, AMFA's legal counsel is present at the table or available by phone or fax, depending upon the need. Members can observe negotiations on their days off, which educates the membership and furthers understanding of what it takes to negotiate a contract.

When a contract is submitted to AMFA-represented technician and related members for a vote, the total package is presented. It is not merely a summary or highlights sheet.

Dues
AMFA dues are two times your base rate of pay, excluding differentials and premiums. For example, if your base pay is $20 per hour, your monthly dues are $40. Dues include representation by a lawyer for a member in arbitration and before the FAA. AMFA also has a $500 fine protection program to offset the cost of a fine.

Structure
AMFA has proven to be the only democratic organization for technical aviation professionals. Through local autonomy the members control all aspects of their union. AMFA is the most democratic union in the airline industry. All officers, from Shop Representative to the National Director, are elected by secret ballot and can be recalled by the Membership. Safety & Standards is an integral part of our constitution, covering all members, and is not relegated to a "committee." AMFA's structure is illustrated by this Organizational Pyramid.

Membership
Technicians and related members vote on all major issues including contract ratification, letters of agreement, amendments to Local Bylaws, and the AMFA Constitution. They also have the authority to elect and recall all AMFA officers.

Locals
Local Officers and Representatives are elected by the Local Membership and can be recalled by the Membership. A petition signed by 25 percent of the members begins the recall procedure.

National
The National Office assists the Locals throughout the system. The National Executive Council hires professionals to provide CPA accounting, legal representation, labor relations advice, insurance/pension actuaries, and National administration. National officers oversee these professionals and report to the Membership. Candidates for national office need the endorsement of only one Local to have his or her name placed on the ballot. National officers are subject to the same recall procedures as Local officials