Strike? Really?

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La Li Lu Le Lo

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May 29, 2010
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I mean you have to laugh.

"The pilots, who fly for one of the world's biggest airlines, have been working without a raise for more than four years while negotiating with airline management over a new contract. "
Big deal. There are a LOT of people that have not gotten raises in 4 years.

These people average $332,100 (widebody) and $267,300 (narrow body) a year to work the equivalent of 43% of what most people consider full time (900 hours) to do a job where a computer does 95 percent of the work and they cry about it.

"We made quite a few sacrifices during the pandemic, and we feel it is now time for the company to step up to the plate and to give us a contract, acknowledging the sacrifices and the contributions that we have made," said pilot Arzu Delp, as he picketed at San Francisco International Airport.
Oh please!!! They think the airline owes them for doing their job? How about the fact the airline kept them employed while flying practically empty aircraft?

"They always have 'work to rule.' They could say, 'We're not working any overtime,'" Wheaton said. "I don't anticipate the pilots trying to screw up travel for everybody intentionally, but bargaining is about leverage and power ... having the ability to do that can be a negotiating tactic."
What these greedy bastards call "overtime" is a normal work week for almost anybody else.

On May 1, American Airlines pilots voted to authorize a strike after pushing for scheduling and work rule improvements in their contracts.
I guess that 75 HOUR work MONTH is just killing them........

I just sit back and laugh at the entitlement the UNION circle jerk breeds in the "membership".
 
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Meh, its all part of the game. There was already a pilot shortage before the pandemic so they're going to get raises.

Unfortunately for APA and ALPA, the pandemic delayed that shortage long enough for training programs to catch up a bit, and Biden as CIC has made the military an even less appealing place to stay than it already was. Regional hiring is still suffering but its not as dire a situation as it was 18 months ago.
 
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I would like someone who is trained in finance, say eolesen, to take a look at total number of pilots, revenue, and profit margin for 2022.

I bet those are going to be some interesting numbers.
 
How much money was made in 2022 shouldn't determine what a contract effective in 2024 looks like.

What needs to happen is agreeing on a contract where both sides can make money from 2024 and beyond... more than one airline has capitulated to a contract that was barely affordable to live by in year one only to have to declare bankruptcy in year four or five or six....
 
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How much money was made in 2022 shouldn't determine what a contract effective in 2024 looks like.

What needs to happen is agreeing on a contract where both sides can make money from 2024 and beyond... more than one airline has capitulated to a contract that was barely affordable to live by in year one only to have to declare bankruptcy in year four or five or six....
Many times a UNION has choked the life out of the employer and everyone loses.

I understand 2022 is not 2024 but there is no more current annual data than 2022. Doesn't the revenue for 2022 coupled with trends in 2023 help forecast future annual revenue for 2024 and beyond? I am not a finance guy but that makes sense to me. I thought that is what a financial analyst did.
 
Many times a UNION has choked the life out of the employer and everyone loses.

I understand 2022 is not 2024 but there is no more current annual data than 2022. Doesn't the revenue for 2022 coupled with trends in 2023 help forecast future annual revenue for 2024 and beyond? I am not a finance guy but that makes sense to me. I thought that is what a financial analyst did.
Many?

Name them all

Last time I checked the companies negotiate and agree the unions don’t get a blank check.

Your anti-union bias is clearly showing now.
 
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Many?

Name them all

Last time I checked the companies negotiate and agree the unions don’t get a blank check.

Your anti-union bias is clearly showing now.
How many businesses have been shut down in lieu of the burden of organized labor?

If it was worth the cost to keep the business open the business would remain open.
 
How many businesses have been shut down in lieu of the burden of organized labor?

If it was worth the cost to keep the business open the business would remain open.
Once again provide facts from reputable sources.

Yet you didn’t, so once again your anti-union bias and full crap once again.
 
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Your anti-union bias clearly shows.

I’ve given you more than an ample opportunity to prove your point. You didn’t so you are just a liar.




You know why they rather close the business than allow it to be UNIONized? It's as I said before, the cost increases to the point that the profit margin is no longer worth operating the business. Why run a business if you are not making money?

During the fight for 15 nonsense I pulled up a financial sheet for Walmart. With the amount of employees Walmart has $15 an hour would have literally bankrupted them. Yes Walmart has a lot of revenue, but they also have a lot of cost.

Believe it or don't.
 
Once again you didn’t prove your point.

Your first article is hypotheticals and didn’t show where a union and its contract caused the company to go out of business.

Your second article doesn’t show how a union and its contract caused the company to go out business.

And neither does your third.

Let me ask one more time.

Show me from a reputable source how a union and its contract shut a company down.
 
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Many times a UNION has choked the life out of the employer and everyone loses.
Show me from a reputable source how a union and its contract shut a company down.
I never said a contract caused a company to go out of business.

How many businesses have been shut down in lieu of the burden of organized labor?

If it was worth the cost to keep the business open the business would remain open.
However business HAS shut down facilities or stopped production altogether in lieu of the burden of organized labor.
The people running the company did not feel the profit margin was worth keeping the employees.

So again, a UNION choked the life out of the employer because they stopped production and everybody lost their job.
Why be in business if you are not making any money? Might as well kill production and put your money where you have a better return. That just makes sense.

I might also remind you there is a LONG list of bankrupt airlines in the
United States (a heavily UNIONized sector). There are so damn many of them they had to make 4 Wikipedia pages to cover them all. I am sure LABOR COST was a contributing factor to many of them going out of business.

 
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