Crew Rest

operaations

Veteran
Jul 31, 2003
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I heard from a friend that some of the flight attendant crew members were calling in sick a alarming rates to protest crew rest and to hopefully get some more flight attendants recalled. He said you ewre only getting a minimum 8 hours rest from block in to block out. If that is the case i feel for all of you . That has got to put a strain on the body and health
 
I haven't heard of a single person doing that. The trips with minimum rest at my base has you need 32 years to hold a spot on them.

There is a fair amout of soon to be retirees, who are burning sick time. AA took their vaction and pay. They wont let them take anything for the 800 or a thousand hours built up from coming to work when you know there were time they were actually sick. So many are using it now.
 
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If I retire I wont get any of my sick time also. That so depresses me
 
I have a ways to go for retirement. I was nearing my max sick time, at 800 hours. Now that we only get 30 hours per year. I have many more years befor I max out. God forbid I actually get sick and use any. Do that and add a couple more years till I reach the max 1000.
 
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On 8/4/2003 8:42:19 AM operaations wrote:

I heard from a friend that some of the flight attendant crew members were calling in sick a alarming rates to protest crew rest and to hopefully get some more flight attendants recalled. He said you ewre only getting a minimum 8 hours rest from block in to block out. If that is the case i feel for all of you . That has got to put a strain on the body and health

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If anything, calling in sick when one is not really sick as a means of "protest" won't do anything other than DELAY the recall of furloughed Flight Attendants, because it hurts the company financially.
 
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On 8/4/2003 8:42:19 AM operaations wrote:

I heard from a friend that some of the flight attendant crew members were calling in sick a alarming rates to protest crew rest and to hopefully get some more flight attendants recalled. He said you ewre only getting a minimum 8 hours rest from block in to block out. If that is the case i feel for all of you . That has got to put a strain on the body and health

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Calling in sick to protest the contract their union negotiated and they voted to approve? Sure hope not - last union at AA to engage in similar conduct (sickouts) found themselves owing AA $46 million (of which $25 million or so was paid to AA).
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On 8/4/2003 9:58:54 AM FWAAA wrote:


Calling in sick to protest the contract their union negotiated and they voted to approve? Sure hope not - last union at AA to engage in similar conduct (sickouts) found themselves owing AA $46 million (of which $25 million or so was paid to AA).
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Sorry but the vote was NO. How it was manipulated to the contrary is the subject of legal action. Well, no effort has been put forth by the company or charges of a conspiracy by the union or its members.
 
True enough, any sort of job action maight result in legal difficulties for APFA. On the other hand if it was proved that safety is jeopardized, AA could be criticized for just proposing it in the first place.
 
That was a recuring problem with POS and SJO, in the past. I haven't heard anything on it lately. I am doing a 17 hour 2 day to SJO in a few days. If we run in to a problem I will post it.
 
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On 8/4/2003 9:03:30 AM FA Mikey wrote:

I haven't heard of a single person doing that. The trips with minimum rest at my base has you need 32 years to hold a spot on them.

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Someone told me some of the super-short international layovers were going away because the company has had problems with legalities. Arrive late, depart late, since there's no cushion of time. Any truth to this? I am no longer able to check for myself.

MK
 
From what I understand, there are a lot of FAs (especially senior FAs) who like the short layovers, because it allows them to get all of their hours out of the way without being away from home as long. On the other hand, I've also heard there are a lot of FAs who don't like them because of the reasons already mentioned (fatigue, etc). I guess it boils down to if you like it, bid for it, if you don't, avoid it. I've worked with the pilot group, and I know they have some similar issues where one group of pilots likes one thing and another group likes another. For instance, commuters love 4-day trips, because they only have to make their commute once to get in a lot of flying, while non-commuters would rather fly a lot of 1-day turnarounds and spend less time away from their families. To each his own, I guess.
 
There has been a lot of controversey about what APFA negotiated. First, it was voted down by a small margin. Then is was a yes by a small margin. The yes vote was considered tainted by APFA for a number of reasons. Then they tried to get a third more "legal" vote but opted to accept the "tainted" vote instead. Then there was the loss of furlough pay for members about to be furloughed. A Federal Judge was not impressed with that one. Additionally APFA tried to halt furlough pay for people who had been furloughed or were about to be furloughed. AA nixed that idea. Then there was the "underfly" traded for another concession and now it is the crew rest issue.
 
>>>From what I understand, there are a lot of FAs (especially senior FAs) who like the short layovers, because it allows them to get all of their hours out of the way without being away from home as long
 
They may be called turns by flight attendants but they are 2 day trips with two separate duty periods. Its a 2 on 4 off month. You layover at the airport so there is no real drive to speak of.

Crew manning can also look and see that the vast majority of these trips go senior. Telling them they are popular. Our short layover trips are the most senior at the base in Miami.
 
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