Flexed Over Benefits

KCFlyer

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Aug 20, 2002
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RV4 - with all due respect - welcome to the real world. I've worked for 4 different companies in the past 10 years and you know something...there were some drugs that weren't covered by ANY policy. My wife suffers from Rheumatoid Arthritis. There's a "miracle drug" out there that costs about 10 grand a year. My insurance won't cover it. I have always had to pay between $150 to $200 a month for family insurance coverage, I pay an $18 copay for "preferred" drugs and much more if the drug is "preferred" by my doctor rather than my insurance company. [BR][BR]You can blow some of these changes up to be as big and bad as you want. Your company isn't knocking on the BK judges door, and IMHO, your company will be one of the last airlines to do so. Things are changing, and there isn't a perfect company anywhere in this world...even if you start your own company...SOMETHINGS going to get under your skin.
 

KCFlyer

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Aug 20, 2002
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RV4 - with all due respect - welcome to the real world. I've worked for 4 different companies in the past 10 years and you know something...there were some drugs that weren't covered by ANY policy. My wife suffers from Rheumatoid Arthritis. There's a "miracle drug" out there that costs about 10 grand a year. My insurance won't cover it. I have always had to pay between $150 to $200 a month for family insurance coverage, I pay an $18 copay for "preferred" drugs and much more if the drug is "preferred" by my doctor rather than my insurance company. [BR][BR]You can blow some of these changes up to be as big and bad as you want. Your company isn't knocking on the BK judges door, and IMHO, your company will be one of the last airlines to do so. Things are changing, and there isn't a perfect company anywhere in this world...even if you start your own company...SOMETHINGS going to get under your skin.
 

WingNaPrayer

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Aug 20, 2002
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The health insurance, with the new changes in benefits, doesn't go into effect until January 1, 2003. So, if the flu treatment wasn't covered, it wasn't covered under the current/existing/old policy...what have you.
 
Aug 20, 2002
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RV4,
I may be wrong, but the ONLY plan that was,nt affected by any changes, was the plan I've had since day one "MO 1"
(more commonly refered to , as the indemnity plan. The old "80/20" plan It's the ONLY plan that you don't have to select a primary care doc., which means "NO GATEKEEPER"!
Over the years, AA has mailed out to us a ton of BS, telling us how much more expensive it would be to use it, as opposed to "PPO", or (GOD forbid), a HMO.

Ever notice that 80/20 is the only plan for retirees.
80/20, was for a long time, the ONLY plan APA would allow.

I realize the "co-pays" are more with 80/20, and it does'nt cover routine check ups,(Which anybody with kids knows can be expensive). That how the "piece of SH*T" HMO's, got their foot in the door.
In this house,(mine) we spend approx. $400 a month for Rx's,(which I pay UP FRONT), and then get reimbursed, in about 3 weeks.
It's a pain "in the AS*",
BUT
It gives me TOTAL control. If I want to go to ANY of the USA best hospital(Mass. general-BOS, Sloan Kettering-NYC, Johns Hopkins-BWI, or the MAYO Clinic-RST) (just to name a few),I call up, make an appointment, and GO. I'll be damned, if I'll "kiss the AS*" of some required primary care-GATEKEEPER, who might wind up playing "bean counter, before doctor" !!!!!!!!!

NH/BB's
AA --(Arrogance & Attitude)


KCFlyer,
Sorry to hear of your wife's medical condition !!!
 
Aug 20, 2002
9,945
671
www.usaviation.com
RV4,
I may be wrong, but the ONLY plan that was,nt affected by any changes, was the plan I've had since day one "MO 1"
(more commonly refered to , as the indemnity plan. The old "80/20" plan It's the ONLY plan that you don't have to select a primary care doc., which means "NO GATEKEEPER"!
Over the years, AA has mailed out to us a ton of BS, telling us how much more expensive it would be to use it, as opposed to "PPO", or (GOD forbid), a HMO.

Ever notice that 80/20 is the only plan for retirees.
80/20, was for a long time, the ONLY plan APA would allow.

I realize the "co-pays" are more with 80/20, and it does'nt cover routine check ups,(Which anybody with kids knows can be expensive). That how the "piece of SH*T" HMO's, got their foot in the door.
In this house,(mine) we spend approx. $400 a month for Rx's,(which I pay UP FRONT), and then get reimbursed, in about 3 weeks.
It's a pain "in the AS*",
BUT
It gives me TOTAL control. If I want to go to ANY of the USA best hospital(Mass. general-BOS, Sloan Kettering-NYC, Johns Hopkins-BWI, or the MAYO Clinic-RST) (just to name a few),I call up, make an appointment, and GO. I'll be damned, if I'll "kiss the AS*" of some required primary care-GATEKEEPER, who might wind up playing "bean counter, before doctor" !!!!!!!!!

NH/BB's
AA --(Arrogance & Attitude)


KCFlyer,
Sorry to hear of your wife's medical condition !!!
 

KCFlyer

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
10,631
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www.usaviation.com
[P]
[BLOCKQUOTE][BR]----------------[BR]On 12/23/2002 7:11:12 AM RV4 wrote:
[P]Where do I get a list of the drugs that are not covered by my insurance plan?[BR][/P]----------------[BR][BR]You might try....your insurance company. You're blowing this somewhat out of proportion. Some drugs are "preferred" over others. For example, your doctor may prescribe Zocor for cholesterol, but your insurance company may "prefer" Lipitor. Usually, your copay will be a bit higher for a "non-preferred" drug. There are some drugs (in my wifes case - Enbril is rather expensive and is not covered except in extreme cases). They most likely will require generics if they are available. Also, a common "gotcha" if the active ingredient in a prescribtion is available in an over the counter medicine...they most likely won't cover you. But it's not as if you are being hung out to dry - they will cover more drugs than they don't cover.[/BLOCKQUOTE]
 

KCFlyer

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
10,631
1,322
www.usaviation.com
[P]
[BLOCKQUOTE][BR]----------------[BR]On 12/23/2002 7:11:12 AM RV4 wrote:
[P]Where do I get a list of the drugs that are not covered by my insurance plan?[BR][/P]----------------[BR][BR]You might try....your insurance company. You're blowing this somewhat out of proportion. Some drugs are "preferred" over others. For example, your doctor may prescribe Zocor for cholesterol, but your insurance company may "prefer" Lipitor. Usually, your copay will be a bit higher for a "non-preferred" drug. There are some drugs (in my wifes case - Enbril is rather expensive and is not covered except in extreme cases). They most likely will require generics if they are available. Also, a common "gotcha" if the active ingredient in a prescribtion is available in an over the counter medicine...they most likely won't cover you. But it's not as if you are being hung out to dry - they will cover more drugs than they don't cover.[/BLOCKQUOTE]
 
OP
R

RV4

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
1,885
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www.usaviation.com
[blockquote]
----------------
On 12/23/2002 7:27:21 AM KCFlyer wrote:

But it's not as if you are being hung out to dry - they will cover more drugs than they don't cover.[/BLOCKQUOTE]
----------------
[/blockquote]

Your analysis is sure to comfort all concerned.

What if I have a side effect to the "preferred" and can take nothing other than the "non-preferred uncovered"? Since when does my health depend on what they prefer? I thought flex benefits was about my choice?

Also,

I think the details might be important when "looking at the financial" books, and making an informed decision regarding AA's cost versus other carriers.

But hey, as long as they cover in quantity more than they don't, no need for "you to worry"...right?
 
OP
R

RV4

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
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www.usaviation.com
[blockquote]
----------------
On 12/23/2002 7:27:21 AM KCFlyer wrote:

But it's not as if you are being hung out to dry - they will cover more drugs than they don't cover.[/BLOCKQUOTE]
----------------
[/blockquote]

Your analysis is sure to comfort all concerned.

What if I have a side effect to the "preferred" and can take nothing other than the "non-preferred uncovered"? Since when does my health depend on what they prefer? I thought flex benefits was about my choice?

Also,

I think the details might be important when "looking at the financial" books, and making an informed decision regarding AA's cost versus other carriers.

But hey, as long as they cover in quantity more than they don't, no need for "you to worry"...right?
 

KCFlyer

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
10,631
1,322
www.usaviation.com
[BR][BR]
[BLOCKQUOTE][BR]----------------[BR]On 12/23/2002 9:38:03 AM RV4 wrote:[BR][BR]Your analysis is sure to comfort all concerned.[BR][BR]What if I have a side effect to the "preferred" and can take nothing other than the "non-preferred uncovered"? Since when does my health depend on what they prefer? I thought flex benefits was about my choice? [BR][BR]Also,[BR][BR]I think the details might be important when "looking at the financial" books, and making an informed decision regarding AA's cost versus other carriers.[BR][BR]But hey, as long as they cover in quantity more than they don't, no need for "you to worry"...right? [/BLOCKQUOTE][BR][BR]---------------- [BR]
[BLOCKQUOTE][/BLOCKQUOTE][BR][BR]Well, here's something from the "real world" that might comfort you. I suffer from Acid Reflux, and as a result had damage to my esophogus. The doctor prescribed Nexium, which the insurance covered for 90 days...after that they don't cover it - it's a "non preferred drug" - and it costs about $200 a month for the prescription. I came off the Nexium and life was once again miserable. All it took was a letter from my doctor that said I needed to stay on the medcication as a maintenance prescription. Bingo - the "non preferred" drug is now covered - $18 a month. Is that so bad? You're making it sound like your company is really putting the screws to you, when in reality they are trying to bring their health care costs in line with other industries. [BR][BR]"Flex benefits" where I work means you can either select a restricted HMO, a more liberal HMO, or a PPO. What you get is determined by what you are willing to pay. Pay more=get more. I chose the "liberal" HMO. I pay about $165 a month for family coverage. FWIW, my employer pays about an additional $700 per month to cover me. You might bear that in mind when considering the "screwing" you are getting from your company.
 

KCFlyer

Veteran
Aug 20, 2002
10,631
1,322
www.usaviation.com
[BR][BR]
[BLOCKQUOTE][BR]----------------[BR]On 12/23/2002 9:38:03 AM RV4 wrote:[BR][BR]Your analysis is sure to comfort all concerned.[BR][BR]What if I have a side effect to the "preferred" and can take nothing other than the "non-preferred uncovered"? Since when does my health depend on what they prefer? I thought flex benefits was about my choice? [BR][BR]Also,[BR][BR]I think the details might be important when "looking at the financial" books, and making an informed decision regarding AA's cost versus other carriers.[BR][BR]But hey, as long as they cover in quantity more than they don't, no need for "you to worry"...right? [/BLOCKQUOTE][BR][BR]---------------- [BR]
[BLOCKQUOTE][/BLOCKQUOTE][BR][BR]Well, here's something from the "real world" that might comfort you. I suffer from Acid Reflux, and as a result had damage to my esophogus. The doctor prescribed Nexium, which the insurance covered for 90 days...after that they don't cover it - it's a "non preferred drug" - and it costs about $200 a month for the prescription. I came off the Nexium and life was once again miserable. All it took was a letter from my doctor that said I needed to stay on the medcication as a maintenance prescription. Bingo - the "non preferred" drug is now covered - $18 a month. Is that so bad? You're making it sound like your company is really putting the screws to you, when in reality they are trying to bring their health care costs in line with other industries. [BR][BR]"Flex benefits" where I work means you can either select a restricted HMO, a more liberal HMO, or a PPO. What you get is determined by what you are willing to pay. Pay more=get more. I chose the "liberal" HMO. I pay about $165 a month for family coverage. FWIW, my employer pays about an additional $700 per month to cover me. You might bear that in mind when considering the "screwing" you are getting from your company.
 

AAmech

Veteran
Aug 22, 2002
766
1
[blockquote]
----------------
On 12/22/2002 6:12:12 PM RV4 wrote:

I hear some folks are already finding out about the new flexed over prescription drug policy.

Guy from worked called, said his son was tested positive for the FLU and the insurance wont cover prescribed medication. "TAMAFLU"

$160.00 out-of-pocket...

Merry Christmas from AA and the TWU.
----------------
[/blockquote]

I'm not surprised they won't cover Tamaflu. It does next to nothing for a flu. At best it shaves a day off the down time. Its just something for the DR. to prescribe to placate patients who don't want to hear the truth, "bed rest and lots of fluids". I bet your friend will spend $6.00 next year on a flu shot.
BTW KC, Our cheapest plan at AA (which I'm on) cost a whopping $30.00 a month w/prescriptions included for me AND my wife. And people complain around here!
 

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